TACC Celebrates Community Achievement at Annual Event

TACC Celebrates Community Achievement at Annual Event

For many East Texans there are months left in the year, but not for the Tyler Area Chamber of Commerce (TACC). Their fiscal year ends on September 30, so their year just came to a close. They celebrated with an annual event recognizing Chamber accomplishments and presenting awards to community members.

I Choose Tyler

The event was held at Harvey Convention Center and catered by Stanley’s and Roast Social Kitchen. The banquet’s theme was “I Choose Tyler,” and that message resonated throughout the evening. “A lot of people come to Tyler for a specific reason,” Henry Bell, TACC’s Chief Operating Officer said, “And they end up staying because it’s just such a great place.”

Tyler Area Chamber of Commerce’s mission is to encourage an environment where businesses can thrive and to enhance both economic well-being and quality of life in the area. Over 2,500 businesses, organizations and individuals make up the association. Amazingly, it is the fourth largest Chamber in the state of Texas.

This Year’s Highlights

The Chamber of Commerce is made up of subcommittees that enhance different aspects of community life and business development. They’re responsible for why so many people do choose Tyler for their place to live and do business.

Big things happened this past year because of each committee member’s commitment to making Tyler even better. Skip Ogle, Chairman of the Board for 2018-2019, introduced a video highlighting accomplishments like these:

  • The Aviation Committee celebrated the completion of Runway 422 at Tyler Pounds Regional Airport, part of ongoing improvements to that side of the facility. On July 2, Frontier Airlines started offering nonstop flights to Denver, connecting Tyler to a second transportation hub.
  • The Energy Committee offered the 2019 Energy Summit of Northeast Texas, bringing key industry experts to Tyler. They also continued to stimulate area job growth by establishing the Federation for Advanced Manufacturing Education (FAME) chapter. This partnership encourages apprenticeships between area businesses and educational institutions.
  • The Surface Transportation Committee worked to improve the transportation infrastructure around Tyler alongside NetRMA, the Texas Department of Transportation, Smith County and the City of Tyler. Work is ongoing in places like Old Jacksonville, Loop 49, Rhones Quarter Road and Paluxy.
  • The Business Development Council hosted multiple expos to support Tyler area businesses. Their program “School is Cool” provided supplies and services for thousands of students before classes started this year.
  • The Business Education Council focused efforts connecting local businesses and the area economy. The program matched city and local business leaders with Tyler ISD high school seniors to work together to ensure senior success.
  • Visit Tyler reported last year visitors spent $386 million in Tyler. The 2019 Azalea Trail alone had an economic impact of almost $1.9 million.

Business of the Year Awards

The Tyler Area Chamber of Commerce presents the Business of the Year Award to local organizations that support TACC’s mission to enhance the business environment, economic well-being and quality of life for the Tyler area. Cooperative Teacher’s Credit Union received the Small Business of the Year Award because of their heart for giving, community involvement and support for the Chamber Education Committee.

Mewbourne Oil Company received the 2018-2019 Large Business of the Year Award. TACC commended the organization’s high standards in hiring and its support of local events.

TACC Award Winners

The Tyler Area Chamber of Commerce presented several awards at the evening event. Bob Garrett, an East Texas real estate developer and president of Fair Oil Company of Texas received the T.B. Butler Award, an award Butler Publishing Company has presented to outstanding leaders since 1929. Friends and associates describe Garrett as a man of his word, who can handle any challenge and do so with integrity.

The W.C. Windsor Award goes to Tyler’s most outstanding person under the age of 40. This year’s recipient was Lindsey Shaver Harrison, director of sales for medical device company NanoVibronix. Harrison founded flippingtyler.com, is a board member of the Children’s Advocacy Center, serves as public relations chair of the Cattle Baron’s Committee and has been involved in several volunteer organizations.

Volunteer of the Year Award

Tyler Area Chamber of Commerce also presented our own Gates Brelsford with the Volunteer of the Year Award. Gates has been the Team Lead for the Energy Summit of Northeast Texas for several years. The March 2019 Energy Summit had a record of 450 attendees and 35 sponsors. The Energy Summit exists to bring top industry experts to East Texas and focuses on:

  • Job creation in Northeast Texas
  • New investment in energy resources
  • Educating the general public about the benefits of the energy industry

For more on this year’s energy summit, see our 2019 Energy Summit of Northeast Texas Recap.

Live Love Tyler

The Chamber welcomed June Cheatham as the 2019-2020 Chair of the Board. She challenged attendees to ponder what it means to live in Tyler, to love Tyler and to live out your love on a daily basis. “To love Tyler is to love its people,” she said, “To commit to its people…which each of you do on a daily basis as you either own, operate or work for entities that provide jobs and stability for the people of Tyler.”

At Brelsford Personnel, that’s a commitment we take seriously. We feel privileged to be part of the Tyler Area Chamber of Commerce and our community. We look forward to serving area residents and members of the business community in the year ahead.

The (Previously) Unwritten Rules of Office Messaging Etiquette

The (Previously) Unwritten Rules of Office Messaging Etiquette

Real-time messaging applications have become extremely popular in the workplace. As you use any tool more frequently, there’s a greater possibility of making mistakes.

It’s so easy to just type out a message to your boss or co-workers and send it without considering the consequences. Save yourself from embarrassment by following these simple rules.

Don’t Flood the Feed

It is annoying to receive multiple messages from the same impatient sender when you step away from your phone for a minute. It is just as annoying (if not more so) when it happens at work.

If your coworker isn’t responding at first, don’t keep prodding them. They will answer you when they have a moment, and will appreciate you giving them time to respond.

Don’t Overuse Emojis

Emojis shouldn’t be part of every message. It’s okay to use one occasionally, but your coworkers don’t want to see forty laughing emojis when you think something is funny. One has just the same effect.

If someone has done something great, then emojis can give expression to your enthusiasm. When you use emojis judiciously, and thoughtfully they enhance your communication. However, using them for everything is unprofessional and not effective.

Emojis are like salt. Adding them to your conversation in moderation makes it flavorful, while overdoing it leaves a bad taste.

Punctuation and All Caps

One exclamation point or question mark will do. Also, as with most online communication, if you use all caps it’s as if you’re yelling.

Don’t Forget You Can Still Email

If you have large attachments or huge blocks of information you need to pass along, put it into an email instead or a text. When you clog the feed with huge verbal chunks, people can’t keep up with all the details.

Carefully crafted email allows for important information to be more appropriately organized. Readers can easily find the information later when they need to remember what the sender said.

Be Aware

  • Don’t use swear words – It isn’t uncommon for people to use curse words in their texting. With your friends and family, it may not be a big deal. At work, you should avoid even acronyms that stand for swear words. Mainstream phrases and abbreviations that are funny outside of work don’t always seem that way in professional conversation.
  • Use caution with slang and acronyms – Stick with plain English and standard grammar unless you’re positive the receiver will understand what you’re sending and the language nuances behind it.
  • Remember everyone can see it – Your coworkers and your bosses can see the conversation, so don’t share personal information about yourself or others. Avoid gossip and refrain from criticizing your coworkers.
  • Tailor your speech – Be aware of who you are speaking to. If you’re talking to your coworkers, it’s usually okay to be a bit more casual than you would be if you were talking to your boss. Don’t let the form of communication take away from your level of respect.

Every Bit Counts

Everything you say to your boss and coworkers can be recorded by office messaging applications, so keep that in mind when you communicate over text. Apps can be a tool that helps you work more efficiently, or they could waste time and damage your professional image.

Don’t let your instant messaging take away from the hard work you put in. Be your most professional self when you’re on the job and save more relaxed communication for after hours.

Personal Tragedy in the Workplace – Showing Support While Respecting Privacy

Personal Tragedy in the Workplace – Showing Support While Respecting Privacy

When you spend 40 hours a week with the same people, you share success and stress, trials and triumph. You get close. But when someone experiences a personal tragedy, it can be hard to know how to react.

When a co-worker experiences a death in the family, divorce, serious illness or other difficult circumstance, you want to show you care, but you also don’t want to overstep boundaries. They may take some time off, but that’s not long enough to heal from a crisis. Here are tips for showing support.

Stay Away from These Phrases

When you don’t know what to say, it’s tempting to use phrases you’ve heard before. Avoid statements like the following:

  • I know exactly how you feel.
  • At least now he/she is in a better place.
  • Everything happens for a reason.
  • You can always try again.
  • God never gives us more than we can handle.

Your goal is to be supportive and say the right things, but those statements minimize what they’re going through. Plus, they’ve probably heard the same clichés from others, and it gets harder each time they’re repeated.

Avoid Comparisons

There may come a time when you can share what happened to you, but immediately after the tragedy, try not to compare what happened to your co-worker to what you or someone else you know experienced. Also, try not to offer advice unless your co-worker asks for it.

Every loss happens differently, and mourning is an individual process. You can let them know you experienced a similar loss and you’re available if they want to talk, then just leave it at, “I can’t imagine what this is like for you.”

But Don’t Avoid Your Co-Worker

Every time you see them, you hurt for what they’re going through. You don’t want to say or do the wrong thing, so it’s tempting to try and stay away. There’s nothing you can do to “fix” what they’re feeling, but you can let them know they’re not alone and that you care.

When you have a chance to talk in private, make eye contact and offer your condolences. Listen if they want to talk, and if not just be there. Send them a text every so often to let them know they’re in your thoughts.

Mail a Card

Tangible evidence of support matters. Buy a greeting card with an appropriate message and give everyone at the office time to write a brief message, then drop it in the mail. That allows everyone to express their concern and willingness to be available. Written words get read again and again. They end up as keepsakes that later, when the person has had time to heal, are evidence of the people who were there for them at the very worst times.

Start a Meal Train

It’s almost always helpful to bring food, and believe it or not, there’s an app for that. Meal Train has a free plan that allows you to create an online meal calendar, designate where co-workers should drop off food, warn about food allergies or meal preferences and send invites through email or social media. People who don’t cook but still want to participate can show support with a gift card or restaurant meal.

There’s no timeline for healing from a tragedy, and the process is difficult. Your co-worker will appreciate your support and concern throughout the process.

How to Deliver Bad News Without Breaking Up Your Team

How to Deliver Bad News Without Breaking Up Your Team

Some conversations you’d give almost anything to avoid. It’s great to celebrate when you meet goals, pass milestones and break records, but some days things go the opposite direction, and you’re the one who has to talk about it with your team. Nothing can completely take away the sting, but if you must be the bearer of bad tidings, careful delivery can minimize the fallout.

Anticipate Questions

Put yourself in your employees’ or teammates’ shoes. When you tell them something went wrong or that things are about to change, their first thought is going to be, “how will this affect me?” Think what questions they might ask and be prepared to answer honestly, tactfully and with respect.

You might have the task of telling employees their raise request was rejected, their evaluation didn’t go well or a project fell through. If you made the decision, be prepared to take responsibility and explain the reasoning behind what you chose. If the bad news comes from someone higher up, try to learn their rationale so you can pass that on.

Talk in Person

If your bad news has an individual impact, talk to each person separately and in private. Don’t communicate electronically through email or text, have a face-to-face meeting if at all possible. When bad news or unwelcome change applies to the whole group, you still might want to have one-on-one conversations if the impact is different on each teammate or a group discussion could lead to conflict.

Be Clear and Direct

This is the hardest part. Don’t ease into the conversation, just deliver the bad news in simple words and plain language. Tell them what’s going on and why. Don’t downplay, sugarcoat or place blame. Don’t try to spin it as a positive, your team needs time to process bad news the way it is.

What happens after you tell them the bad news is as important as your delivery itself. Allow discussion, but don’t get involved in debate. Communicate clear timelines or deadlines for the change. You might have to repeat information as employees or team members mentally break it down. Show them courage and calm, even if that’s not what you’re feeling inside.

Listen

If your employees are going to feel anxiety and stress during the change or because of bad news, acknowledge that. If the bad news means less money or more inconvenience, don’t try to talk people out of being upset.

Realize their negative reaction is normal and give them time to process. You can’t change the news, but you can listen to how they feel about it.

The best leaders show they’re willing to face personal discomfort to do what’s best for their organization. When you deliver bad news with empathy and respect, your team knows they can trust you to be honest even when the truth hurts.

What Not to Wear to Your Next Job Interview

What Not to Wear to Your Next Job Interview

Your resume got you in the door, and you’re already thinking about how landing the job will make your life better. The next step is the interview. The person you’re meeting with will be watching everything you say and do to evaluate whether you’re the right fit for the job. If you wear any of the following, the first impression you make might not be what you hope.

Wild and Flashy Attire

When you select your interview attire, stay away from loud colors and wild prints. No cheetah or tropical print, no neon colors, and no large logos or slogans. It’s better to stick with simple and classic.

That goes for accessories as well. Avoid big earrings and chunky necklaces and bracelets. Nothing you wear should jingle when you move.

Don’t put anything flashy on your head. Big hair bows and beanies are distracting. Also, leave your sunglasses and headphones in the car.

Makeup can be wild and flashy too. It’s better to wear light, neutral colors so your interviewer remembers your intelligence, not your eye shadow.

Strong Scents

Don’t wear heavy perfume or cologne. If you’re not sure how scented you are when you apply your favorite fragrance, ask someone you trust or skip it altogether when you go for your interview.

Tight or Baggy Clothes

How your clothes fit matters. If you have to struggle to get into any part of your outfit, choose something else. You’ll look much more professional if you avoid attire that’s form-fitting. Also, stay away from clothing that shows cleavage, your midriff or tattoos and body piercings.

You can go too far in the other direction as well. Baggy pants and oversized tops can make the wearer look sloppy. The interviewer could infer your work might be sloppy too.

Uncomfortable Shoes

Flip flops are too casual, but they aren’t the only type of shoes you should avoid. Choose something simple, professional and basic. You can’t predict how much walking you’ll do before, during and after your interview, so it’s best to avoid new shoes or tall heels. If your feet hurt, it’s harder to focus on the interview.

Anything Transparent

Don’t wear clothing that has material you can see through, no matter how trendy it is. Undergarments should never be visible when you go for an interview. Also, don’t wear clothing that has holes in it.

The best idea when planning interview attire is to research the company you hope to work for. Check their social media pages to see if they have pictures of employees at work, or drive by the parking lot a few days before your interview. See how current workers dress, then choose attire that’s slightly more formal than what you see.

At Brelsford Personnel, we want candidates to have all the tools they need for success. For more on typically acceptable attire, visit our resources page.

Job Search Differences Men vs. Women

Job Search Differences Men vs. Women

Men and women don’t approach the job search in the same way. As East Texas employers and employees seek to eliminate gender inequality, it’s important to recognize the thought processes that go into job application. There are things both genders can learn from each other.

Biggest Job Search Gender Difference

Previously we had the chance to interview former Tyler Mayor Barbara Bass for an upcoming Tyler Executive Women’s Network event. She pointed out how women tend to think they’re not qualified enough or that they need more skills to apply for a position.

They typically look at the list of job requirements and if they can’t check off every one of them, they think it would be a waste of time to apply. When women don’t apply, they say it’s for reasons like the following:

  • I didn’t think they would hire me because I didn’t have all the skills on the list. I didn’t want to waste my time and energy.
  • I felt like submitting my application would waste the hiring team’s time. It would be inconsiderate since they had already made it clear what they were looking for.
  • I didn’t want to put myself out there when it seemed I might fail.
  • I thought there were probably more qualified people out there. I didn’t think I could perform the job as well as they might be able to.

A Hewlett Packard internal report also found in Harvard Business Review says men apply for a position when they meet 60 percent of the requirements, where women only apply if they meet them all. It’s an eye-opener when women realize there are likely people applying who are less qualified.

Rules vs. Guidelines

Tara Mohr, author of Playing Big: Finding Your Voice, Your Mission, Your Message surveyed more than 1,000 professionals of both genders to compare their thought processes during a job search. She found women thought not applying for a job when they didn’t fit all the requirements was playing by the rules. Men are less likely to view the qualifications as rules at all.

If men had more than half of the required qualifications, they felt they could “sell” their ability to do the rest. Women listen to an inner voice that tells them they’re not good enough while men are less likely to hear that message.

Who is Right?

It’s important to note that when employers post job descriptions, it’s not only a wish list. They don’t just think it would be nice to find someone with most of the skills, but much of the job description will be actual requirements.

We’re not saying apply for positions you don’t have the skills for and hope to fake your way through the hiring process. That creates problems for both the employer and employee. Women are right to take job descriptions seriously.

However, if a job looks like a good fit, don’t hesitate to submit your resume for fear someone else might be better than you. Your skills and personality could be exactly what that employer is looking for. Men are right to approach a job with confidence if they know they have the skills.

Other Gender Differences

A Fairygodboss study found men and women use different resources in their job search. Men were more likely to use social media and LinkedIn. Women were more inclined to consult friends and family or job review sites.

Men and women have different motivation for seeking new employment in the first place. Men say they apply for a new job because they want more money or a promotion. Women are more likely to move because they have personal life changes and want more work/life balance or are looking for a position that’s more meaningful and challenging.

Brelsford Personnel has decades of experience placing both men and women with some of the best employers in the area. We have one-on-one conversations with applicants to fully understand their qualifications and career goals. For employers, we don’t suggest a candidate until they meet the majority of the qualifications – tangible and intangible. Find out the Brelsford difference when you get in touch today.

Legal Assistant Jobs – Skills That Get You Hired

Legal Assistant Jobs – Skills That Get You Hired

Brelsford Personnel has well-established Tyler-based law firm clients that occasionally have openings for legal assistants. Legal assistants, also sometimes called legal secretaries or paralegals do more than just answer the phone and type. Every employer we work with has unique needs and requirements, but there are some skills all legal assistant jobs require.

Education Requirements

It’s preferred that candidates applying for legal assistant jobs have a paralegal certificate or associate’s degree in paralegal. A bachelor’s degree in another area alongside a paralegal certification is also useful. In rare situations, East Texas lawyers may hire college graduates who don’t have the necessary certification and provide on the job training.

Technology Skills

A legal assistant is like a lawyer’s right hand. The attorney relies heavily on him or her to perform computer-based tasks like composing and typing documents, keeping time for billing, updating calendars and transcribing recorded information. Applicants for legal assistant jobs should be proficient in word processing applications, spreadsheets and presentation software. Attorneys may require additional technology skills or legal specifications depending on their practice and specialization.

Attention to Detail

In legal, every detail matters and attorneys depend on their legal assistants to get those details right. Strong legal assistants don’t get bogged down when documentation piles up or flustered when the stakes are high. They proofread every character like it’s critical, because it often is. They don’t let the little things slide even when they’re tired because it could cost their firm a client.

People Skills

Many legal assistant jobs require you to work for more than one attorney at a time. You should be able to adapt cheerfully to different personalities and requirements, juggling assignments and priorities.

You’ll interact with clients, attorneys, other legal assistants, court personnel and more. Whether you communicate in person, by phone, through email or on a video conference, you should be able to remain friendly and professional.

Research Skills

Legal secretary educational programs prepare you to create legal documents like subpoenas, legal memos, discovery documents and briefs. You should already have a basic knowledge of court filing rules and legal terminology. However, every case is different, and your firm will frequently need you to dig for information. Attorneys hire professionals with strong fact-finding and legal research skills.

Brelsford Personnel typically has legal assistant openings in the East Texas area. View available positions online and apply from within each job posting.

How to Resign Without Burning Bridges

How to Resign Without Burning Bridges

If you’ve found a new job, congratulations! It’s exciting to think of the opportunities ahead, but first, you have to wrap things up with your current employer. There’s no getting around the fact that resigning is uncomfortable. Even if you’re positive you’ll never be back, you want to leave on good terms. Let’s look at the basics on how to resign from a job.

Frequently Asked Resignation Questions

How soon do I need to turn in my resignation notice?

Two weeks’ notice is standard for most positions.

Can I tell my boss I’m quitting in a text message?

No. You’ll need to write a professional resignation letter and have an in-person conversation. If you can’t meet with them in person, make a phone call.

Who do I need to tell first?

When you resign, talk to your direct manager before you let co-workers know you’re leaving.

Can my company stop me from resigning?

If you’re bound by a contract of employment, there may be stipulations for how and when you can quit. Otherwise, your boss may hate to see you go, but he or she can’t refuse your resignation.

What if I’m quitting because I’m fed up with my job?

Keep things positive during your resignation. You want to leave on good terms, so avoid complaining or bragging about your new job.

Resignation Letter Basics

Don’t just drop off a resignation letter, talk to your employer first in person or over the phone. If they ask for a formal letter, recognize it will go in your employment file, so you want to keep things professional.

A formal resignation letter should be brief, polite and to the point. Start with a friendly opening like, “Dear Ms. Smith,” or “Dear Bob,” depending on how you normally address your manager. Then, clearly state your intent to resign.

Give your employer a reasonable amount of time to hire your replacement. Let them know in your letter when will be your last day of employment. You don’t have to share your reason for leaving, but in some situations it helps. For example, if you’ve decided not to return from maternity leave or your spouse got a job offer out of state. Letting your boss know takes some of the sting out of your resignation. It’s also acceptable to say you’re resigning for personal reasons.

Let your employer know you’re willing to help out if necessary. You might be able to help train a new hire or transition some of your duties to a co-worker within your department.

Finally, express gratitude. Whether you liked your old job or not, focus on the positive. Thank your employer for the experience, the opportunities and the knowledge you gained from working at his or her company. Use a friendly closing like “Sincerely,” or “Respectfully.”

If you’re looking for new opportunities, experience Brelsford Personnel’s fresh approach. Browse the positions we have available online, then get in touch.

What Tech Skills Will Get Me a Better Job?

What Tech Skills Will Get Me a Better Job?

Most people are comfortable using a smartphone and computer for personal use, but some may lack the technical skills employers are looking for. Computer skills are prized by employers in a range of sectors. Add these skills to get hired and prepare yourself for professional success.

Word Processing Skills

Word processing is a basic skill required for most professional level positions. The most common applications include Microsoft Word and Google Docs. It’s a good idea to know how to find your way around in both. Here are a few of the skills most employers expect you to be able to perform:

  • Open the word processing program and access a previously saved document
  • Use “Undo” and “Redo” editing functions
  • Cut and paste from another document
  • Show and hide toolbars
  • Adjust page margins, line spacing and page orientation
  • Change font, size, color and style
  • Insert symbols, images and tables
  • Save documents to a desired location
  • Share documents via email or other online collaboration portals

Spreadsheet Skills

Companies often store vital information using spreadsheets like Microsoft Excel or Google Sheets. They allow you to organize, calculate, graph and analyze data. Familiarize yourself with how to identify cell references, enter and delete data, modify column width and format information. You should also know how to use basic formulas to make calculations easier.

Email

This is one of the staples of workplace communication. It’s how you’ll receive information about what’s going on with your company. Email is also how you’ll communicate with supervisors, co-workers and clients. Employees should know how to access, compose, format and send an email. It’s also a good idea to know the rules of email etiquette.

Touch Typing

Not all jobs require you to be lightning-fast, but you should be able to type without looking at the keyboard. You’re more efficient when you don’t have to hunt and peck. Plus, you make fewer errors when you can keep your eyes on the screen, not the keyboard.

If you don’t have this basic skill, don’t despair. Online resources like typingclub.com and keyhero.com offer free evaluations and typing exercises you can use to help improve your skills. While you’re at it, familiarize yourself with basic keyboard shortcuts for easier copying, pasting, printing and window switching.

Presentation Software Skills

If your position involves presenting your ideas within the company or to clients and customers, you’ll need a basic knowledge of common presentation software. PowerPoint and Keynote are two of the most commonly used.

For digital presentations, you’ll need to know how to create and edit a new, blank presentation, open a recent presentation, access what you’ve created from other places on your computer or network, add and edit slides and run your presentation once it’s started.

Willingness to Learn

This doesn’t just relate to computers. Technology is constantly changing. As employers update to stay competitive, you’ll likely be required to learn new computer skills. Sometimes it feels uncomfortable to work with new programs, but keep an open mind.

At Brelsford Personnel, we’re always looking for East Texans with a solid skill base and a positive attitude. Browse our online job postings to look for your new job today.

How to Mistake-Proof Your Resume

How to Mistake-Proof Your Resume

When you send your resume and cover letter to prospective employers, mistakes and typos could ruin your chances at an interview. You know what you meant to say, so a quick scan isn’t going to reveal the mistakes that will stick out to recruiters and hiring managers. Use these tips to make sure your resume and cover letter don’t contain embarrassing errors.

Always Use Spell and Grammar Check

Most word processing programs automatically check for spelling and grammar, but they don’t make corrections for you. Go back through your document and review where your program marked errors. Word underlines mistakes with a squiggly red line and Google Docs uses solid red.

Grammarly has a free online grammar and spell checker that catches some errors word processing programs don’t. If you’re not creating your document online, you can upload it for a thorough error scan.

Don’t Edit Tired

If you just spent hours creating your resume, take a break. Come back when you’re rested, you’ll be glad you did.

Print for Proofing

You’ll be better able to spot errors on a paper copy than on a screen. Once you print your resume, use your finger to underline one word at a time as you read. The first time through, look at spelling, grammar and punctuation without editing for meaning and data accuracy. Clearly mark changes with a contrasting color pen so you can add them to your electronic copy later. Then read through again for information consistency.

Check for Common Errors

Spell check won’t catch a word used incorrectly. Make sure the subject and verb of every sentence agree with one another. Only place commas where the reader would naturally pause. Use an apostrophe with “its” only when you mean “it is.” Be careful with the commonly confused “affect” and “effect.” You “accept” offers, not “except” them. Most employees work with a manager, not a manger.

Read out Loud

This proofreading trick will catch errors you don’t notice any other way. Read your resume one word at a time at a pace similar to what you would use when speaking. If something doesn’t sound right, stop and fix it, then read it again.

Verify Hyperlinks

If the electronic copy of your resume contains links to articles you’ve written, online reviews from customers or other materials, click them to make sure they go where you intend. You could have typed URLs incorrectly, or pages might have been moved.

Ask for Help

See if a professional acquaintance or mentor will proofread your resume for you. A fresh set of eyes can make all the difference.

For more resume writing tips, see our dynamic library of useful resources. Our blog also offers help with writing a cover letter, preparing for an interview and having a successful first day on the job.