How to Attract the Best East Texas Employees Part 4 – Securing Top Millennial Talent

How to Attract the Best East Texas Employees Part 4 – Securing Top Millennial Talent

A Changing Workforce

There’s always a difference between the mindset and work habits of different generations. At many companies, Baby Boomers are in leadership roles and seeking to attract, hire and manage millennials, a population segment with vastly different work habits and expectations. Attracting top millennial professionals starts with understanding what motivates them.

Millennials By the Numbers

A person who became a young adult during the 21st century is a Millennial. Most researchers say this group was born between the early 1980s and the early 2000s, with some demographers arguing for a little earlier or later. The oldest Millennials are in their late 30s, while the youngest are still teenagers.

Pew Research found Millennials became the largest generation in America’s workforce in 2016. Last year there were 56 million of them looking for a job or actively employed. By 2020, they will make up half the country’s workforce and 75 percent in 2025.

What Millennials Want

Attract top Millennial talent by first understanding what they want. Deloitte questioned more than 10,000 individuals in 32 countries to generate their seventh annual report on Millennial business motivation, ethics, workplace optimism and concerns.

They found diversity and flexibility are the key to attracting loyal millennials.

While Millennials recognize profits are necessary, they don’t think that should be an organization’s main goal. They feel corporations should put a premium on the following:

  • Changing society for the good
  • Protecting the environment
  • Creating jobs that improve people’s lives
  • Stimulating both diversity and inclusion at work
  • Encouraging innovation

Millennials want to work where they can grow and have a future. Ninety-one percent of them say they want rapid career progression. They expect employers to have clear policies on how to earn bonuses, raises and promotions.

In the Deloitte study, two-thirds of Millennials say they will probably have left their current employer by 2020. Many of them cite poor leadership development as their reason for leaving.

Millennials grew up with technology, and they want to use it at work. They embrace Industry 4.0, which uses big data, powerful analytics, automation and the Internet of Things.

They also want training. Only 36 percent say they feel their organization is helping them prepare for technology of the future. They also want help developing soft skills like confidence, critical thinking and creativity.

Benefits to Attract Top Millennials

Employers compete for highly qualified candidates in every age group. Attract Millennials when you offer these benefits.

  • Career development – Provide training programs and team building opportunities. Offer skill-specific training, but also provide opportunities to develop interpersonal skills, critical thinking, creativity and responsible online behavior.

 

  • Positive social interaction – Younger employees want to interact. Encourage a monthly brown bag lunch to mix departments and management levels. Volunteer together, have a summer cook-off or send teams to one of the area’s escape rooms. Put Millennials in charge of planning.

 

  • Flexible scheduling – Instead of sick or vacation time, offer flex time employees can use as needed. You can still require employees to work traditional hours and request schedule changes, but provide them with a set number of hours to “spend” as they please. Other flexible scheduling options include a compressed work week, split shifts or scheduling that allows employees to complete work on nights and weekends.

 

  • Emotional and physical health support – Show employees you care with subsidized gym memberships, group participation in East Texas cycling and running events and free mental health support.

Keeping Your Best Millennial Employees

Going back to the Deloitte study, two thirds of all Millennials say they’ll probably quit their current job by 2020 and one in four says they plan to quit this year. Mentally tally how many people work for you who are younger than 40. What if a quarter of them quit?

You lose everything you invested in recruiting, onboarding and training them. You have to start over, and it will take time before their replacement finds their stride within your organization.

Millennials Leave for Better Opportunities

A Forbes article says often Millennials leave even when they like their job because they were offered a better opportunity. Keep that from happening by giving them opportunities to grow and advance within your company. Spell out what it takes to get a raise so they know when they can expect increased pay.

Sometimes Relocation is the Issue

People of every generation relocate when their spouse has a job change or a family member needs long-term care. If it’s mutually beneficial, offer telecommuting to keep employees who transfer to another area.

Millennials Quit to Learn New Skills

Sometimes members of this group feel dissatisfied with their current career path and think they can’t advance without more formal education. Consider offering scholarships for employees who want schooling to advance their careers, but also provide training and opportunity inside the workplace.

Hire the Best East Texas Employees

Brelsford Personnel provides East Texas employers with professional, top-performing employees. We’ll find the right fit for your job vacancy, and we tailor our services to fit both your needs and budget. Get in touch to hire the best East Texas employees every time.

Sources:

https://www2.deloitte.com/global/en/pages/about-deloitte/articles/millennialsurvey.html

https://www.centralbank.net/learning-center/how-to-attract-and-retain-millennial-workers/

http://fortune.com/2017/06/27/best-companies-millennials/

https://www.cnbc.com/2017/07/20/want-to-attract-and-retain-20-something-employees-dont-treat-them-like-millennials.html

https://www.robertwalters.com/content/dam/robert-walters/corporate/news-and-pr/files/whitepapers/attracting-and-retaining-millennials-UK.pdf

http://fortune.com/2016/03/04/attracting-millennial-talent/

https://www.business.com/articles/how-are-companies-changing-their-culture-to-attract-and-retain-millennials/

Content by Missy for Brelsford Personnel

The Smart Way of Investing in Talent

Courtesy of peoplematter.in

In this dynamic world, it is difficult to find people who can act as the sole resource, and are also the only source of expertise in your organization, hence it is important for any company to identify the right set of people and invest in them.

The Smart Way of Investing in Talent

It is interesting to think about what the professional domain at large would look like if organizations were being run solely by all-powerful, ultra-accomplished, ingenious, multi-talented beings who had an expertise in every possible field and who knew everything there was to know about everything.

Well, for one, it would be a far less diverse landscape. Fortunately, therefore, the human brain, as well as the general human potential, simply does not support such a scenario, leaving us with both a challenge as well as an opportunity.

The challenge here is that in a reality where it is impossible for one single person to be the sole resource and source of expertise that a company needs, there is an always an urgent need to look out for all the right people who would effectively fill those gaps. But the opportunity here is that the process of bringing people and talent onboard has the potential to do so much more for your company than just filling gaps!

Today’s Talent Forecast says

Is there an organization anywhere that does not invest its time and energy in planning for the future? (If there is, my heartiest condolences to them on their inevitable downfall and demise.) Planning ahead lies at the heart of all organizational goals and it is the one process that determines all the individual elements that will be factored into the organization’s framework in the future – including, of course, its talent.

But how do we know when or how to bring the right talent onboard?

Let’s start with getting back to the organizational planning process. Priorities are discussed, goals are set and decisions are made – more often than not within the confines of a closed conference room by the people primarily in power – the senior management. An error made most often in these situations is the exclusion of the individual managers or department heads more closely involved with the specifics of the issues being deliberated upon. The fact that these department heads are left out of the major decision-making process means that the organization misses out on their potential for providing information and advisement; their expertise, after all, is all about gaining a better understanding of the status quo as well as the nitty-gritty of the everyday dealings (which would help better understand the feasibility and impact of the decisions). Most importantly, however, it means missing out on their informed suggestions to bring onboard the talent and expertise that the company currently needs or might possibly need in the future.

As a general rule, including more people in the decision-making process not only helps optimize the talent you already have but helps your company gain foresight and in some cases, an edge when it comes to determining its fate in the future. It is on the basis of the educated guesses, instinct and professional opinions of the internal ‘people in the know’ that some of the most successful companies have been able to make the significant decisions that were not understood at the time but reaped incredible rewards years down the line.

This holds true most prominently in the matter of the what, who and when to bring the right talent onboard.

You see, it works as an incredible, beneficial cycle – if one were to let it run, that is. The talent you already have, bring with them the knowledge and thorough understanding of their department, which in turn makes them the best people to predict the trends in that department and hence identify and bring the talent that would help your department keep up with those trends. What’s more, since they are the in-house talent lending their skills to recruitment, they are better able to recognize the value and culture fit that their company is looking for.

The right talent in a company can achieve so much more than fulfilling job descriptions or playing pre-defined parts in the organizational story. It has the potential to effectively and accurately chart out a map to the future, filling the gaps (and job descriptions) that the company does not even know it needs yet! Previously unexplored perspectives come into view and when this talent becomes a part of the core strategy meetings, rest assured your company will be steered into the right direction and invigorated with new, fresh talent.

The War For Talent Is Over. This New War Will Replace It.

[Courtesy of forbes.com]

The War For Talent Is Over This New War Will Replace It

William Vanderbloemen , CONTRIBUTOR

I cover topics about having a strong faith and building a business. The future doesn’t belong to the talented. It belongs to the cultured. Culture cannot be taught but competency can.

The War For Talent Is Over This New War Will Replace It

Photo courtesy of Shutterstock

The last three hires I’ve made at Vanderbloemen, I have passed on super competent candidates in favor of less “talented” people.

I couldn’t be happier with my choices.

Why? I’m convinced that culture trumps competency every single time. So I’ve focused my hiring on people who fit our culture. I’ve trusted that competency (read, talent) can largely be learned. So far, the theory is proving to be true.

In our work as an executive search firm, we are constantly asked about the “war for talent.” I read articles that bear titles like: “There aren’t enough people to go around,” or “The Coming Talent Crisis.” As the baby boomers age, we face the largest wave of retirement in US history. Smart people are noticing that. They’re also aware that there aren’t many people available in the next generation, and it’s causing a panic.

At the age of 31, I became a young leader of a large church, and I noticed this pattern right away. Over 90% of all pastors in my type of church were over 40. So I went after young pastors for our staff. I hired three that were the most talented guys I’d ever interviewed. But I failed to focus on cultural fit and failed to pay attention to developing a healthy culture. No matter how much talent I hired, it never seemed to work out. I should have paid more attention to building good culture and hiring around it.

Now that my team has completed over 10,000 face to face interviews, I’ve been watching the talent horizon for a long time. I agree, there’s a shortage coming. But talent won’t be the trump card for winning as an employee or employer in the long run.

The future doesn’t belong to the talented. It belongs to the cultured.

Leaders who know their company culture and hire around it will see far more dividends than those who hire just for talent. Similarly, people looking for their “dream job” will find it when they look for a company that they fit culturally rather than simply a company that has a high growth rate or even a better compensation package.

Culture trumps competency every single time. Why?

Culture cannot be taught but competency can. With the dawn of the digital age, we now live inside the largest library ever. Nearly everything can be learned online. Look no further than the popularity home improvement shows, the rise of shows that spot unspotted talent in a crowd like The Voice, or the vast surge of online courses that can be taken to learn a new skill. I saw an ad for an online cooking course designed for “The Single Vegan Dad Trying To Feed Kids On a Tight Budget!” Ten years ago, nobody even knew what “DIY” meant. Now, it’s a part of our vocabulary (if you don’t know what it is, then figure it out yourself…).

So if you’re looking for a leg up on the job hunt, or if you’re trying to hire for the future, focus on these questions:

  1. Does the workplace have a well articulated company culture? Far too many companies have “cultural values” listed somewhere on paper, but they are pabulum. They use words and phrases like, “We value excellence.” Who doesn’t? Instead, look for values that stand out and uniquely name the DNA of the company. One example is the Netflix Culture Deck. Another example is our company values at Vanderbloemen that our team crowdsourced and cemented together about four years ago. Company values shouldn’t be stashed away in a file somewhere. You should be able to spot them in the daily rhythms of the company.
  2. Does the job (if you’re searching) or the employee (if you’re hiring) operate with the “same kind of crazy” as you? The more I study companies and people, the more I’m realizing that we are all some form of crazy (starting with me and my strange journey to running my company). Admitting that is the first step toward finding people and a workplace that thrives. When we interview people for our team, we start with giving them a list of reasons they really don’t want to come work here, and we use our cultural values to frame those questions. For instance, we require a very high, almost OCD, obsession with quick responses to clients and candidate. It’s our value of “ridiculous responsiveness.” We say to interviewees, “If you like predictable, routine, easy to schedule work, please save yourself and leave the interview now. We’re not that, and you’ll probably think we are crazy.” This gives both our team and the candidates we’re interviewing a litmus test during the vetting process that can help us assess cultural match early on.
  3. Is the core competency of the job something that can be easily learned? Some things can be taught quickly. Other things, say brain surgery and rocket science, do take intensive training that cannot be overlooked. But my guess is that most jobs have a higher quotient of “learnability” than most people initially realize. While it might take ninety days for a person to fully develop a skill set, I believe a cultural match cannot be taught, no matter how long the person has to learn it.

Culture isn’t just a buzzword. It’s the new currency for both hiring the right people and finding your dream job.