How to Get Your Employees to Show Up Every Day This Fall

How to Get Your Employees to Show Up Every Day This Fall

Cold and flu season is coming. Employees have probably already started asking off for holiday travel. Sometime in the next few months, you’re probably going to notice you have more staff calling in than usual. You want them to stay home when they’re sick, but you also need them to keep absenteeism to a minimum. There are things you can do to reduce the number of call-ins.

Formalize Your Attendance Policy

Spell out exactly what you expect. Answer the following questions:

  • At what time are employees tardy?
  • What types of absences will you approve? How should employees document them?
  • What is the procedure for requesting an absence?
  • How many absences do you consider excessive?
  • What disciplinary action will you take if they exceed that number?
  • What happens if someone is a “no show”? Are there emergency situations in which you’ll excuse an unscheduled absence or no call?

Put your attendance policy in the handbook, make it a part of new hire orientation and explain it in your next staff meeting.

Promote Wellness

Sometimes well-meaning employees show up when they’re just coming down with a cold or the flu. You disinfect the bathrooms, but what about other surfaces with which employees come into contact? Make antibacterial wipes available and encourage their use on keyboards, desktops and landlines.

Step back and look for places germs can hide. That candy basket on the breakroom table has been sitting there for months. Employees eat lunch then reach for a piece after touching their faces. The microwave handle, refrigerator door, coffee pot handle and vending machine buttons all need regular disinfection.

Reward Attendance

Think through the most common reasons your employees miss work and use that to incentivize attendance instead. If you know last year employees called in to get their Thanksgiving shopping done without the crowds, reward perfect attendance the rest of the month with a few hours of flex time to be used as needed. Enter employees who stayed healthy all winter in a raffle to win a massage or gym membership on January 1.

Keep Good Records

When someone calls in, document who it was and why. That might seem like a no-brainer, but you’d be surprised how many managers rely on their memory. It seems like Suzy’s chair was often empty, but they’re not sure exactly how many days she actually called in sick, how many she was just late and for which ones she claimed a last minute family emergency.

Documentation helps you spot trends. If you see Suzy calls in every Friday and Monday, you know the problem probably isn’t persistent infection. You’ll also notice those employees who never miss a day and deserve recognition.

Often having a formal plan and a reward system clarifies expectations and encourages attendance. Create yours now for employees that show up every day this fall.

Sources:
https://www.naturalhr.com/blog/reducing-workplace-absenteeism-five-simple-tactics
https://www.masterclassmanagement.com/ManagementCourse-DealingWithAttendance.html

Simple Ways You Can Improve Employee Motivation Today

Simple Ways You Can Improve Employee Motivation Today

If you manage East Texas employees, there’s a tough season ahead. This time of year parents struggle to get into a fresh back-to-school routine. Almost everyone starts thinking toward the holidays. Distractions and fatigue make motivation start to wane.

You’ve seen your team at their best, and you want to minimize disengagement. Try these simple strategies to reignite a spark that’s beginning to flicker.

Launch a Monthly Recognition Plan

A paycheck is a good motivation for showing up, but what you want is for employees to give their very best. To do so every day takes a tremendous amount of energy and dedication.

The ones who give the most do it from the heart. They often feel an emotional connection to their work. They get personal satisfaction from a job well done and feel like they are a part of your company’s mission. Acknowledge them to point out those traits to others.

Make it a public recognition to affirm to those employees they’re doing the right thing, that they’re the best of the best. Point out specifics so other staff members know what you’re looking for. Recognize them on social media so their family and friends know they’re great at what they do.

Survey employees to find out what type of recognition means the most to them. Would your employee of the month most value a certificate they can hang on their wall, a designated parking space, extra flexible minutes or other awards?

Write Thank You Notes

Go to a Tyler or Longview office supply store and get a box of blank notes with envelopes. Use them to create hand-written thank you notes. Sure, it’s the digital age and email is easier, but that’s what will make your statement of appreciation into a keepsake for the recipients. They don’t have to be long or complex.

There probably are already a few people you need to thank. Sit down and give yourself a head start as soon as you have your stationery.

Notes can be as simple as “Dear April, I don’t know if you realize how much you bring to our business. The way you smile and greet everyone who walks through the door makes this a warm and inviting place. Thank you so much for always being incredibly positive.”

Chunk Big Projects

No, we don’t mean chunk them out the window. One solution could be the Agile Method. It was developed in the software design industry, but it is effective for almost all teams responsible for completing large or complex projects.

The way it works: Instead of giving groups the whole elephant to eat at once, break assignments down into smaller portions and complete them in timed sections called “sprints.” Plan a small amount of the work to be done and set a time limit during which everyone works as hard as possible. Then take a break, reevaluate and move on to the next phase.

You may find teams accomplish more in a shorter time frame than they would plodding along at a steady pace with no definite deadline. It is also motivating to frequently point out how much ground the teams have covered.

Micro-Manage Less

Give your teams autonomy while they’re working toward each goal. People want to feel they’re in charge of their work, their time and their accomplishments. If you’re constantly telling them how to do what you hired them for, it’s an energy sucker. A true sense of ownership is motivating.

Sometimes hiring managers say they would turn over tasks to their employees, but they don’t have people they can trust to take charge. At Brelsford Personnel we screen candidates to find those who don’t just have the skills, they’re passionate about what they do. Get in touch, we’ll help you find the staff that meets your needs and budget.

Sources:
https://www.naturalhr.com/blog/its-not-all-about-bonuses-how-to-motivate-employees-for-free
https://hiring.workopolis.com/article/5-ways-inspire-motivate-employees/
https://www.snacknation.com/blog/how-to-motivate-employees/

How to Rock Your First Day on the Job

How to Rock Your First Day on the Job

No matter how excited you are about starting your new job, you’re probably also nervous. It’s hard being the new kid, and you want to make a good first impression on the people you’ll be working with for in the foreseeable future. Try these tips to make that first day a success.

The Night Before

Your nerves are already prickly, so use that extra energy to make the next morning go smoothly. You’ll sleep better if you know you’re prepared.

Dress code varies by workplace. Take your clothing cues from the people who sat in on your interview.

Don’t just pick out what you’ll wear, try it on. If you bought something new to make a strong first impression, make sure it looks as professional in your bedroom mirror as you remember it did in the store. Locate the belt, scarf, shoes and jewelry you intended to wear with it.

If you wear brand new shoes you take the chance you’ll be limping by lunchtime. It’s better to select a pair you know will get you through the day with a spring in your step.

Set your alarm for at least half an hour earlier than you will on most days. Aim to arrive much, much earlier than you are required to. At best you’ll be there early, enter relaxed and make a great first impression. If something goes wrong, you’ll still be on time.

When You Arrive

Take a deep breath before you walk in the door and remind yourself no one expects you to learn everyone’s name and master every procedure on the first day. Show your positive attitude and enthusiasm for your new job and the rest will follow.

Nervousness makes people hunch their shoulders, look down and avoid eye contact, none of which looks friendly. Keep your head up and shoulders back as you meet people. Make eye contact and offer a welcoming smile.

Lean in when people are speaking to show you’re actively listening. Offer a handshake when you meet people, then allow your arms to hang at your sides instead of crossing them.

When you meet people, repeat their name back to them to help yourself remember. Say something like, “It’s great to meet you Samantha, how long have you been with XYZ Company?” If their name is unusual, ask how they spell it to help etch it in your memory.

Throughout the Day

Ask questions and seek help when you need it. People understand you’re new and will likely see your questions as eagerness to do a good job. If you attend training, show up with a note taking device and use it. Stay off your cell phone and don’t use your work computer for personal use.

If people invite you to eat lunch with them or attend an after-hours activity, join them! Express appreciation for the invitation, and for other ways people help you your first day.

In the evening, if the company website includes employee photos, review names and faces. Plan as thoroughly for your second day as you did for the first and you’ll find yourself in a positive routine that brings success in all the days to come.

Sources:
https://www.themuse.com/advice/what-you-must-do-the-night-before-starting-a-new-job
https://www.salary.com/articles/first-days-on-the-job-15-ways-to-make-a-great-impression/
https://www.livecareer.com/career/advice/jobs/first-days-working