Should You Take a Temp Job When You Need a Career?

Should You Take a Temp Job When You Need a Career

Holiday hiring is starting, and some East Texans are wondering if they should take a short-term gig or hold out for something more permanent. Temp positions might last only a short time and sometimes can go longer. They also may be like an extended job interview that results in a career.

If you’re offered a short-term position should you take it? Everyone’s situation is different, so we encourage job-seekers to weigh the benefits against the risks.

A Temp Job Means Income

With a temp job, you don’t have the long-term security that comes with a permanent role. You may not be eligible for benefits or vacation time. However, you know for a set time frame what you can count on earning.

When deciding whether to accept a temp job or wait for another potential employer to call, temping pays the immediate bills.

Short-Term Can be a Good Thing

You’ve heard it said that people don’t quit their job, they quit the boss. Last year CBS News reported 51 percent of America’s workers feel disengaged because of their job responsibilities or their supervisor. Hopefully your temporary job will be a positive experience but if it isn’t, you’re not stuck.

You’ll Add Experience to Your Resume

When you have a long gap between jobs, it can look bad. A temporary position fills that gap. (Put it on your resume and indicate that it was temporary.) If you’re a college student or recent graduate, sometimes short-term employment gives you the experience you need to find something more permanent.

You Have the Opportunity to Shine

To have the best chance at making a temp job permanent, treat it like a long-term commitment. Learn as much as you can about the company and your responsibilities. Build relationships with co-workers. Show up early every day dressed for success.

One of the benefits of temping is the ability to gain experience and expose yourself to a variety of personality types and processes. Soak up as much information as you can. Whether your position leads to something more permanent or not, your new skills make you more valuable.

Be on the lookout for ways you can make an impact. If a supervisor asks you to take something on that isn’t one of your assigned tasks, show a willingness to contribute.

If you found your temporary position through Brelsford Personnel or another employment agency, we have a strong relationship with the East Texas company you’re working for. Let us know if you’re interested in a full-time position and if one is available, we can inquire on your behalf.

Resources You’ll Need When Your Job Brings You to Tyler

Resources You’ll Need When Your Job Brings You to Tyler

If your new job is bringing you to East Texas, congratulations! You’re relocating to one of the most beautiful parts of the state, maybe even the nation. When individuals move for employment, it’s like a fresh start, but there are many unknowns. Here Brelsford Personnel provides links and information to help make the transition a little easier.

Connecting Utilities When Moving to Tyler

Inside the city limits Tyler Water Utilities provides water, sewer and trash pickup. If you don’t currently have service with them, you’ll have to stop by their office at 511 W. Locust Street or fill out an online application. They’ll ask for your picture ID, a lease or contract for the address you want service and your social security card.

If you’re moving from out of town you can upload your documentation. Tyler Water Utilities charges a non-refundable $50 connection fee and usually connects service within a business day.

Centerpoint Energy is the gas provider for the area. It’s possible to connect service by filling out their online form or contacting a representative.
Deposits range between $55 and $100 depending on your credit. They usually take a few days to turn on service and require someone be present when they do. They provide a window for their arrival that can stretch over several hours.

There are several choices when it comes to electricity, so it helps to shop online for what best fits your family’s needs. Choose Energy and Power2Switch allow you to compare plans from TriEagle, Frontier, Bounce Energy and other providers.

TXU Energy is the most widely used electricity supplier. They have several billing plans available, and people can order service online or over the phone. TXU runs your credit to evaluate the deposit, and if your credit is good they may waive it altogether. People with credit problems might have to pay up to $250.

Moving to Tyler and School Enrollment

Tyler Independent School District (TISD) provides education for students from kindergarten through 12th grade and offers an online registration process. If your child hasn’t ever attended a TISD school, they ask once you’ve completed online enrollment you bring these documents to your child’s campus:

  • Birth certificate
  • Social security card
  • Current immunization records
  • Proof of residency like a utility bill or lease agreement in your name
  • Evidence of withdrawal from previous school if your child attended somewhere else
  • Your photo ID

If you’re not sure what school your child should attend, check out the Tyler ISD attendance zone map for the current year, as geographic areas for attending specific schools are in the process of changing.

Resources You’ll Need When Your Job Brings You to Tyler

Smartphone Apps for Moving

Reduce stress during your move by staying organized. Technology can help you take a systematic approach to everything you need to accomplish. Download one of these apps to keep your to-do list handy at all times.

  • Moving Organizer Lite is a free download for Android and iPhone. It comes with checklists for common tasks and helps you keep track of what’s in boxes.
  • MoveAdvisor is basically a calendar app that tells what you need to accomplish week by week when you put in your intended move date.
  • Moving Tips is also free, and offers ideas for expert packing, long-distance moving, protecting your furniture and unpacking at your destination.

If you’re still looking for a job that will allow you to move to Tyler, Brelsford Personnel can help. Check out our online job postings or contact us today.

Sources:
https://www.forbes.com/sites/jacquelynsmith/2013/11/20/8-tips-for-a-successful-job-relocation/
https://www.tylerisd.org/
http://www.cityoftyler.org/Departments/TylerWaterUtilities/WaterServiceCenter.aspx
https://www.txu.com/view-plans.aspx?customerclassification=residential&cint=4&dwel=01&prom=ONGMINITPS&zip=75703&tdsp=ER_ONCOR&eLease=false
https://www.centerpointenergy.com/en-us/

5 Things You Need to Remove from Your Resume In 2017

[Courtesy of LinkedIn.com]

Five Things You Need to Remove from Your Resume In 2017

Everyone agonizes over their resumes. We all worry that if it’s not perfect, we may not get a call from a recruiter. However, when you constantly gather feedback from peers and experts, you may end up making the job search too confusing before you even start.

Ultimately, you only want to consider one thing when you write your resume: the reader. The reader isn’t the evil applicant tracking system that throws out your resume according to some algorithm. The reader is a real, live person. Your task is to make it easy for them to understand what you do and what your accomplishment are in 1-2 pages.

Trust me, I’ve read my share of resumes. In the last four years, I’ve averaged between 20-35 open technical jobs that I was responsible for filling. In each, I selected between 5-10 candidates to interview and put forward. This equated to between 200 and 350 people I spoke to – every week. Not to mention every hiring manager I spoke to as well. Over a year, this equals 16,800 resumes. That’s just the ones that I selected, not counting all the others I declined.

Take it from me: Here are the five things you want to cut from your resume, if you haven’t already:

1. Multiple Fonts

For the most part, recruiters aren’t going to read your whole resume. They’ll look at your title, company, and dates of employment for each job, and then move on.

The human eye is a funny thing. If you have several different fonts on the page, it may mess with the reader’s comprehension. They’ll have to reread certain sections of the resume just to make sure they understand – if you’re lucky, that is. If you aren’t lucky, they will just move on to the next candidate.

Plus, all those fonts are making my eyes hurt. Please stop.

2. ‘References Given Upon Request’

We know they are. We will ask you for references if we decide to give you an offer. This is premature in the relationship. All you’ve done so far was send a cover letter and resume.

3. Long, Boring Bullet Points

Here’s a good rule of thumb: If a sixth grader can read your resume and understand what you do for a living, than a non-technical recruiter can, too. The odds that the person reviewing your resume doesn’t fully understand what you do for a living are high. That’s why you want to write punchy bullets with accomplishment statements woven in. Use a simple format to present your tasks and achievements quickly. White space is your friend. I promise.

Five Things You Need to Remove from Your Resume In 2017

4. Funny or Odd Email Addresses – or Worse, Your Company Email Address

It’s a job search. Be professional. I once had a job seeker list “foxylady@gmail.com” as her email address. After 15 years of doing this work, I still remember it. Enough said.

5. Industry or Company Jargon

The reader has no idea what the “Tiger Team” or the “Eagle Project” were. Be safe and drop anything highly technical and industry- or company-specific – especially acronyms. If you must use such language, spell it out. High-tech companies are known for having special languages that don’t translate to anyone outside of the company. Years ago, I read resumes from candidates who were let go from Intel. It was confusing and time-consuming. They were lucky, because I ended up calling them and asking a lot of questions. Most recruiters won’t do that. They’ll just skip over you entirely.

Job seekers often write too much (and never too little) out of fear. They are afraid if they don’t list every little detail on their resume, they won’t get a call to interview. This approach often backfires. If you put your resume “out there” for 30 days and no one responds, stop sending it out. Chances are what you wrote on your resume works just fine, but you should also know when it’s time to pull the document and refresh it.

Why You Need To Hire Job Candidates With These Three “Weaknesses”

Why You Need To Hire Job Candidates With These Three “Weaknesses”

BY TOMAS CHAMORRO-PREMUZIC
[COURTESY OF FASTCOMPANY.COM]

One personality expert says hiring managers need to stop downplaying candidates’ flaws.

Facebook’s Head of People told Fast Company last week that her team of recruiters works hard to uncover candidates’ strengths. Most companies try to do much the same. They assess the qualities and skills they believe job performance depends on, and they design interviews to test whether candidates are likely to display those qualities once on the job.

This isn’t exactly a mistake, but it’s only part of the puzzle. Everyone has weaknesses and drawbacks that they’ll invariably bring with them, too. What hiring managers usually do is just try to decide whether a candidate’s strengths will outweigh those detriments.

But what they don’t often do is systematically determine which types of “personality flaws” they’d rather have on their teams. After all, some are a lot worse than others, and some can even be assets under the right circumstances.

WHAT YOU WANT VS. WHAT YOU’LL GET

There are millions of different jobs, and each company has its own culture, so what employers actually want in job candidates varies widely. But personality research suggests that all strong candidates tend to look rather similar, in the sense that there’s a limited number of attributes that make them strong: They’re generally more rewarding to deal with, more capable, and more willing to work hard than others are. Employers may use many different names for what they want–grit, adaptability, emotional intelligence, entrepreneurialism–but what they always need is ability, likability, and drive. You can ride those qualities to the bank any day of the week.

But while these three competencies predict future job performance and career success with remarkable accuracy, they don’t tell the full story about a candidate’s potential. In fact, no matter how attractive a candidate’s “bright side” may be, they’ll always have a “dark side,” too–a set of undesirable or counterproductive traits that hinder their ability to work well, mostly because of their disruptive effects on others.

Hiring managers tend to focus on attributes that predict positive career outcomes–like teamwork, engagement, performance, and leadership skills–and neglect the ones that predict derailment and failure: coasting, underperformance, antisocial behaviors, and the like. But whenever you hire somebody, they’re bringing a combination of these qualities with them through the door every single time. And your standard “What’s your biggest weakness?” job-interview question isn’t enough to help you assess the total package.

More often than not, questions like that are simply meant to evaluate candidates’ social skills and preparation; they’re basically an invitation to fake modesty or disguise additional strengths as weaknesses. Asked about her worst habit or character trait, an astute candidate will confess to being “a perfectionist,” “too altruistic,” or “too humble.” Then she’ll deliver a handy anecdote pretending that those qualities aren’t actually valuable in most workplaces–which astute interviewers know they often are.

Just think what would happen if a candidate answered by candidly listing their real faults, like being lazy, grumpy, selfish, or dim. At best, they might earn points (or even sympathy) for bold-faced honesty, but their chances of landing the job would fall to zero on the spot. Most people would wisely decline an invitation to hang themselves, but employers would assume no responsibility for those brazen or foolish enough to accept it. In practice, asking about weaknesses is just an easy way to eliminate some candidates without having to think too hard.

Yet none of this changes the fact that certain weaknesses are preferable to others. So if you want to assess the whole person and make sure you hire people with the best overall personality profiles, you can’t pretend they’re flawless. Instead, you need to look–intentionally–for the least problematic weaknesses a candidate might have. Here are three of them:

1. CONFORMISM

We live in a world that celebrates “originals” and rule-breakers, but no organization (or society) could function if such individuals made up the majority. In fact, any collective system requires the bulk of its people to follow rules and norms, and employers know this.

While many companies say they need innovators and disruptors, what they truly require is people who will do what they’re told. As Susan Cain recently pointed out in the Times, this isn’t a bad thing; “followership” is a skill set we need just as badly as leadership. (“Perhaps the biggest disservice done by the outsize glorification of ‘leadership skills,’” she adds, “is to the practice of leadership itself . . . It attracts those who are motivated by the spotlight rather than by the ideas and people they serve.”) And yet you’ll find no job listing out there that includes terms like “obedient” or “dutiful,” except perhaps in the military.

Still, a great deal of psychological research suggests that rule-bound and conscientious individuals tend to perform better–even when they are leaders (presumably because they can still please their own bosses). As I show in my latest book, a large number of bosses would rather promote obedient and easygoing employees than talented but difficult ones. And in fact, many actually do.

2. ATTENTION-SEEKING

We might be fascinated by narcissists, but the common view is that great employees and leaders let their achievements speak for themselves. If two people are equally talented or productive, most of us would say that we’d rather work with the one who avoids self-promotion and seems humble and modest.

Yet meta-analytic studies show that attention-seeking individuals emerge more often as leaders, and they’re often perceived as more effective once they do, according to 360-degree feedback data. The danger, of course, is that many attention-seeking job candidates may also be narcissistic, so the best-case scenario is someone who enjoys performing and being the center of attention but isn’t actually self-obsessed or entitled.

In other words, it isn’t always a bad thing to hire an altruistic exhibitionist–a selfless clown.

3. (A DOSE OF) DISHONESTY

Make no mistake: Pathological dishonesty is harmful, particularly when coupled with low integrity. You don’t want to give a job to a lowdown liar.

But dishonesty isn’t a categorical evil in practice. Not only is it minimally problematic in small doses, but most of us know how it can even be useful, as the phrase “white lie” indicates. People who are brutally honest straight-talkers may even struggle more in their careers than those who are able to fake it–within reason–particularly if they seem authentic in the process.

That may not sit well with you, but there’s research to suggest, additionally, that dishonest people tend to be more creative (perhaps because lying requires creativity and imagination). So if you’re hiring someone for a creative role, there’s a better chance you’ll be interviewing candidates who are adept at bending the truth. But most of them probably won’t be doing it maliciously. After all, the premise that we should “just be ourselves” is both naïve and foolish given what we know of human psychology.

Behaviorally, full authenticity describes acting without inhibitions or constraints, as we do when we’re partying with our friends–not a great formula for the workplace. The ideal employee is capable of exercising diplomacy and adhering to social etiquette, and this inevitably requires being at least somewhat dishonest: telling people that they’ve done well when they haven’t (especially if they’ve tried hard); telling your boss she had a great idea when in fact she didn’t; making a client feel like the most important person in the world when they’re actually really irritating.

So don’t stop looking for candidates’ strengths. If you are lucky enough to attract employees who are able, likable, and driven, just make sure that they have the best possible flaws. Sometimes a dose of dishonesty, attention-seeking, and conformism may be the most tolerable defects you can ask for.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Dr. Tomas Chamorro-Premuzic is an international authority in psychological profiling, people analytics, and talent management.