Oil and Gas Industry News from the 2018 Energy Summit

Oil and Gas Industry News from the 2018 Energy Summit

A large number of East Texas jobs are tied to the oil and gas industry, and the last few years have been rocky. Oil prices fell to extreme lows at the end of 2015 and since then have continued to fluctuate. The 2018 Tyler Area Chamber of Commerce Energy Summit is April 5, and Gates Brelsford is the TACC Energy Committee Chairman. Here’s what you can expect at the Energy Summit and in the year ahead.

What’s Happened Since the Last Summit

Last March in a KLTV interview Mr. Brelsford said prices were under $50 a barrel, but he and other experts predicted a climb. That prediction was correct.

Demand grew steadily. OPEC and other major suppliers agreed to trim production to support prices. The new U.S. administration lowered regulations and the situation with the Department of Energy became more favorable.

Currently crude oil is over $60 a barrel and natural gas ranges between $2.50 and $3.00 per thousand cubic feet (Mcf). This year’s energy summit will focus on what that means for Texas and the rest of the world.

The 2018 Energy Summit

The theme for the eighth annual event is “The Texas Energy Industry’s Impact on the Global Economy.” More than 300 attendants join together to hear from the following speakers:

  • Bernard L. Weinstein – Dr. Weinstein is currently Associate Director of the Maguire Energy Institute and Adjunct Professor of Business Economics at Southern Methodist University’s Cox School of Business. He is the author of multiple books and articles on energy, public policy, taxes and the economy.

 

  • Ruben S. Martin – Mr. Martin is President and CEO of Martin Midstream Partners, a publicly traded limited partnership with operations throughout the Gulf Coast region. He brings to the event his in-depth knowledge of best industry strategies and his diversified understanding of operations.

 

  • Christi Craddick – Texans elected this Midland native to serve as Texas Railroad Commissioner in 2012. Since then Craddick has prioritized the fight against policies that stifle growth. She advocates educating the public on how the oil and gas industry impacts Texas and for responsible environmental policies.

 

  • Ernie Cagle – Mr. Cagle is Executive Vice President of Delek US, Inc. He is also President of the company’s refineries here in Tyler and in other Texas, Arkansas and Louisiana locations. He has more than 40 years of experience in the industry and has contributed to refining technical support around the world.

 

  • Brent Jasper – Mr. Jasper is President of Jasper Ventures, Inc. The company umbrellas Veritas Gas Processing, Vulcan Field Construction, Vanguard Processing Solutions and Viking Dew Point Conditioning. Brent’s father Jon Jasper created the company more than 25 years ago, and the family continues to make a difference in East Texas and the world.

 

  • Michael Thomas – VME started as a small fabrication company in Tyler, and under Thomas’ leadership it has become a multi-national organization with offices in the United States, Malaysia, Singapore and Indonesia. Thomas says over the years VME has been intentional about hiring the best people they could find, prioritizing honesty and integrity.

What About Jobs?

Oil is a commodity, so it has its ups and downs. Over the last year there has been increasing price stability and greater consumer confidence. Gates Brelsford says that confidence has a significant impact on hiring.

In the first three months of 2018, East Texas has experienced a marked uptick in hiring from energy companies. Much of this is due to global forecasts. The International Energy Agency in Paris predicts over the next three years, United States production will cover 80 percent of the world’s increased demand.

That growth and stability creates confidence. When organizations look into the future and see the potential for steady growth, they feel good about hiring more staff.

The speakers at the Energy Summit of Northeast Texas have a lot of positive things to talk about. They have reasons to be excited, and here at Brelsford Personnel we share in their excitement.

Check out our online job postings, including positions in the oil and gas industry, or contact us for an appointment today.

Missy Ticer is a blogger and East Texas resident who found her dream job. Content is exclusively for use by Brelsford Personnel.

5 Tips for Protecting Your Business from Cyber Attack

How to Protect Your Business From Cyber Attack

Recently both KETK and KLTV reported on a Michigan audit that should concern employers everywhere. Auditors planned a covert cyber-attack to discover their vulnerability, and the results were stunning. They sent a fake phishing email to 5,000 employees and almost one third of them opened it. A fourth clicked on the link that, had it been real, could have downloaded malware. One fifth put in access or other personal information. No matter what the size of your business, cyber security should be a top priority.

One problem employers have is you can’t always control what your employees are doing online. Attempts were successful not because an insider had malicious intent, but because people just got in a hurry. Distribute these tips as a reminder for long-term employees and an onboarding tool for new hires.

Know Your Vulnerabilities

Here are the most common types of cyber threats:

  • Phishing – Cyber attackers send fake email to try and fool recipients into providing information. It may look like it came from Bank of America or Tyler Water Utilities. It may have the appropriate logo and the same font that business uses. Recipients click on the link provided and the site prompts them to enter their passwords, account numbers or other personal information.

 

  • Malware – This type of program looks like it came from a trusted source. It prompts users to install fake antivirus software or download an update and often instructs them to click past security warnings from their antivirus or browser. Viruses, Trojans and spyware are all forms of malware. Some lurk on your computer and record keystrokes; others hide in the background and store credit card numbers. Imagine the damage if malware goes undetected while it steals your clients’ financial information.

 

  • Ransomware – This is a type of malware that takes over your computer, network or server and denies access to your data until you have paid a fee. Cybercriminals charge Bitcoin to remove encryption, and the price can range from a few hundred to a few thousand dollars. It’s typically delivered as part of a phishing scam or as an email attachment. The files can’t be encrypted without the key provided by the attacker, so if you don’t have a recent backup you either have to pay up or lose your data.

 

  • Botnets – It sounds like sci-fi, but Botnets are networks of infected computers under an attacker’s control. The infected computer functions normally, but works to corrupt as many devices as possible.

How to Protect Your Business From Cyber Attack

Communicate With Staff

This is perhaps the most important thing you can do to protect your data, but it requires an ongoing effort. Your employees are busy doing their jobs, so they aren’t always thinking about cyber-security. Train them not to open unexpected attachments, and then remind them regularly. Set a reminder on your calendar to have a cyber-security refresher course.

Viruses often arrive in email that looks like it was sent from family members, friends, co-workers and acquaintances. The email might have genuinely come from that person without their knowledge.

Avoid files with the extension .exe, but all extensions can hide a virus. Unless the attachment is expected, call or text the sender to see if it’s legitimate.

Test Their Knowledge

Find out which employees are paying attention and who needs additional training by sending your own phishing attack. Show employees what just one click can do and, if they continue to repeat their mistakes, implement repercussions. Test them once a month using one of these phishing simulators.

Safeguard Passwords

Remind employees to keep their passwords in a safe place. A post-it note on their monitor is not a safe place. Security is about control, and the only way to absolutely control who uses your computer is to be the only one who can log in.

Regularly Update Your Anti-Virus

Cyber-attackers continually develop more sophisticated technology. They make money at it, and they’re very intelligent. Regularly updating your anti-virus software makes it equipped to handle threats as they evolve.

Brelsford Personnel stays consistently up to date on the challenges faced by East Texas employers. When candidates work with us to find a job, we make resources available like our Employee Cyber Security Handbook. Contact us to find out more.

*Missy Ticer is a blogger and East Texas resident who found her dream job. Content is exclusively for use by Brelsford Personnel.

5 Things You Need to Remove from Your Resume In 2017

[Courtesy of LinkedIn.com]

Five Things You Need to Remove from Your Resume In 2017

Everyone agonizes over their resumes. We all worry that if it’s not perfect, we may not get a call from a recruiter. However, when you constantly gather feedback from peers and experts, you may end up making the job search too confusing before you even start.

Ultimately, you only want to consider one thing when you write your resume: the reader. The reader isn’t the evil applicant tracking system that throws out your resume according to some algorithm. The reader is a real, live person. Your task is to make it easy for them to understand what you do and what your accomplishment are in 1-2 pages.

Trust me, I’ve read my share of resumes. In the last four years, I’ve averaged between 20-35 open technical jobs that I was responsible for filling. In each, I selected between 5-10 candidates to interview and put forward. This equated to between 200 and 350 people I spoke to – every week. Not to mention every hiring manager I spoke to as well. Over a year, this equals 16,800 resumes. That’s just the ones that I selected, not counting all the others I declined.

Take it from me: Here are the five things you want to cut from your resume, if you haven’t already:

1. Multiple Fonts

For the most part, recruiters aren’t going to read your whole resume. They’ll look at your title, company, and dates of employment for each job, and then move on.

The human eye is a funny thing. If you have several different fonts on the page, it may mess with the reader’s comprehension. They’ll have to reread certain sections of the resume just to make sure they understand – if you’re lucky, that is. If you aren’t lucky, they will just move on to the next candidate.

Plus, all those fonts are making my eyes hurt. Please stop.

2. ‘References Given Upon Request’

We know they are. We will ask you for references if we decide to give you an offer. This is premature in the relationship. All you’ve done so far was send a cover letter and resume.

3. Long, Boring Bullet Points

Here’s a good rule of thumb: If a sixth grader can read your resume and understand what you do for a living, than a non-technical recruiter can, too. The odds that the person reviewing your resume doesn’t fully understand what you do for a living are high. That’s why you want to write punchy bullets with accomplishment statements woven in. Use a simple format to present your tasks and achievements quickly. White space is your friend. I promise.

Five Things You Need to Remove from Your Resume In 2017

4. Funny or Odd Email Addresses – or Worse, Your Company Email Address

It’s a job search. Be professional. I once had a job seeker list “foxylady@gmail.com” as her email address. After 15 years of doing this work, I still remember it. Enough said.

5. Industry or Company Jargon

The reader has no idea what the “Tiger Team” or the “Eagle Project” were. Be safe and drop anything highly technical and industry- or company-specific – especially acronyms. If you must use such language, spell it out. High-tech companies are known for having special languages that don’t translate to anyone outside of the company. Years ago, I read resumes from candidates who were let go from Intel. It was confusing and time-consuming. They were lucky, because I ended up calling them and asking a lot of questions. Most recruiters won’t do that. They’ll just skip over you entirely.

Job seekers often write too much (and never too little) out of fear. They are afraid if they don’t list every little detail on their resume, they won’t get a call to interview. This approach often backfires. If you put your resume “out there” for 30 days and no one responds, stop sending it out. Chances are what you wrote on your resume works just fine, but you should also know when it’s time to pull the document and refresh it.