5 Signs Your Job Interview Went Well

5 Signs Your Job Interview Went Well

You were exhilarated when you walked out the door, but almost as soon as you got in the car, you started replaying the interview in your head. Now you’ve been over and over the questions and answers, looking for clues you might receive a job offer soon.

Often, the way an interviewer responds gives hints into which way they’re leaning. They may still be considering other qualified applicants, but these are signs the interviewer thinks you might be the one they’re looking for.

The Interview Was Long

If you went in expecting to spend 30 minutes answering the standard interview questions and came out two hours later, that’s an extremely positive sign. If the recruiter or hiring manager spent a lot of their time with you, they think your resume, experience and personality indicate you might have what it takes. They’re trying to get to know you better so they can feel good about making an offer.

Your Interviewer Introduced You to the Team

In a similar way, if you were scheduled to meet with one person and during the interview things changed, that’s a good sign. They might say, “Hey, if you have a few extra minutes, I’d like you to meet Sam, Frank and Sherry,” then introduce you to other members of management or of the team you’d be working with.

It’s even better if they give you additional information about those other people. If they say, “Frank likes football too,” or, “Sherry won the graphic artist competition last year,” they’re trying to get you to connect with them, and them with you.

You Connected With the Interviewer

If you felt like there was an immediate rapport with your interviewer, that’s a sign your interview went well. You might have discovered you have things in common. They might have gone off script and stopped asking traditional questions and started asking detailed questions about your previous job experience.

Or, they might have indicated their positive response with body language – leaning toward you, nodding to show they’re interested, making good eye contact and staying engaged with your answers.

They Try to Sell You The Job

One sign a job offer might be on the way is when your interviewer spends a lot of time explaining the benefits of the job you’re applying for. When they talk up the great bonuses people received last quarter, how the company offers unique amenities or where they go for the company retreat every year, they’re hoping you’ll consider accepting their offer.

The Interviewer Talks About Next Steps

It’s always a positive sign when the interviewer plans for the next stages of the process. They might ask how much notice you need to give at your current position or how soon you could start. It’s also a plus if they say you’ll hear from them within a specific time frame.

The next step in applying for jobs available through Brelsford Personnel is to submit your resume. Browse our job postings to get started.

Simple Strategies That Impress All Employers

Simple Strategies That Impress All Employers

You feel like it should have happened already. Every day you show up on time, you do your work, you support company initiatives. It seems like by now you should have received a promotion or a raise. But somehow they keep going to someone else. Your boss is nice, but they don’t really notice you. Here are some simple ways to show administrators that you’re capable of more responsibility and deserving of higher pay.

Go Above and Beyond

Many job descriptions include similar responsibilities: show up at this time, dress this way, do these things, go home. But if you’re doing what everyone else is doing, you aren’t standing out in the eyes of your boss. That’s where going above and beyond can help you.

Don’t just show up on time, try to show up a few minutes early. If you have to stay late, do so cheerfully. The employees that show a willingness to get the job done are going to leave an impression.

Leave your problems at the door when you arrive every day. Do your best to remain positive throughout the day. The employees that complain about everything are the ones that resent extra responsibility, so don’t let your boss put you in that category.

Rise above the rest by asking how you can help. When your boss notices you are taking the extra initiative, they’ll remember when it comes time for a promotion or a raise.

Get to Know Your Boss

As much as it would be nice to say that raises and promotions are 100% performance-based, they usually aren’t. When it comes time for a raise, your boss is going to think of the people they frequently interact with first. If that’s you, you’re in a better position to get that extra responsibility and pay.

Getting to know your boss doesn’t just mean introducing yourself and saying hello when you see them. It’s more about the relationship. Your job is to support your boss and make his or her life easier. Supporting their goals and priorities is a good way to start. Have conversations with your boss about their expectations and your expectations. Learn how they communicate best and use that to improve your relationship. Take a look at Better Listeners Make Better Employees – Here’s How to Get There.

Look to the Future

Communication is the basis of relationship. If you want to succeed, you must communicate. Just like you take time to get to know your boss, let him or her get to know you. Talk to your boss about your future goals.

Demonstrate a long-term interest in not just your boss, but also the company you work for. When you make their goals your own, it shows them that you have the company’s best interests at heart and that you’re ready to take it to the next level.

When You’re Really Stuck

Sometimes you hit a dead end because there’s no possibility for growth within your organization. If that’s the case, you might need to look somewhere else, and Brelsford Personnel can help. If you’re looking for a better position, we place qualified employees in some of the most sought-after jobs all over East Texas. Take a look at our job postings today.

Writing Carefully Crafted Job Descriptions for Capable Candidates

Writing Carefully Crafted Job Descriptions for Capable Candidates

If your job description is too broad and general, you might get stuck wading through a deep pool of unqualified applicants. If it’s too specific or uses the wrong terms, you might miss out on the person you need for the job. Here’s how to write a job description that provides a clear job title, describes tasks, sells your company and avoids discrimination.

Start With Research

Don’t just dust off the ad you used last time you had a similar opening, because jobs change over time. First, talk to the managers and team members who will be working with the new hire. After they fill you in on basic responsibilities, ask them what tasks the previous employee excelled at and how that helped your business overall. Find out also where pain points exist or areas of need went unaddressed.

Don’t forget to ask about additional duties they might need the new hire to take on that don’t necessarily go with the rest of the job description. For example, if your receptionist also handled your monthly newsletter, you’ll either need to hire someone who is comfortable with that task or find someone else willing to step into his or her shoes. Make a list of the skills you need and the type of person who will be a good fit.

Write A Clear Job Title

Use clear, straightforward language when you write a job title. Don’t try to be creative, even if you’re looking for someone who thinks outside the box. In other words, if you need someone to provide material for marketing, use the job title “Content Writer,” not “Language Mixologist.” The second choice creates vagueness and confusion.

Sell Through Your Summary

Give candidates a brief summary of what you’re looking for and what you offer. This is your chance to state why they benefit from working for you rather than your competitor. You’ll go into more detail later, but let them know why they don’t want to put off submitting their resume.

Outline Job Responsibilities

This is where your research comes in. Help candidates understand what they can expect to contribute on a regular basis. If, for example, you’re looking for an accounting assistant, a vague job description might say their job is to, “support the accounting department as needed.”
A better description of responsibilities might be like this one Brelsford Personnel developed working with one of our East Texas clients.

Writing Carefully Crafted Job Descriptions for Capable Candidates

Explain Must-Haves

Detail the experience level, certifications, degrees or other qualifications candidates absolutely must have before you’ll consider hiring them. This is a list of the must-haves to go with the responsibilities listed above.

If you have absolute requirements and a wish list, be clear about which is which. If you wouldn’t consider hiring a candidate without XYZ certification, and you’d like them to already know how to use ABC software but you’re willing to train, make sure it’s clear where you’re flexible and what’s absolute.

Detail Benefits

Tell potential employees everything that could be theirs if they win the job. List everything from bonuses to flexible work days.

Call to Action

Help candidates know how to take the next step. For online job descriptions, include a button or link to your application. For print ads, include a call to action that tells candidates how, when and where to apply.

Help With Job Descriptions

Brelsford Personnel finds the right candidate for the job every time. When you work with us, we get to know your company and your needs, then we create job descriptions that help attract the perfect fit. Learn more when you get in touch.

4 Holiday Workplace Problems and How to Avoid Them

4 Holiday Workplace Problems and How to Avoid Them

Holidays can be just as stressful as they are happy, both for managers and employees. Planning can help businesses avoid some of the common problems that go along with the season. Let’s jump right into ways to head off some of the most common seasonal problems before they occur.

The Christmas Party

You’ve seen the worst-case scenario in the movies, and you might have experienced it in real life as well. People get caught up in the celebration and forget they’re at a work-related event. Set the tone early and avoid potential problems by planning ahead. Review the employee handbook together and let all staff know the same standards apply at company-sponsored events.

In your invite, mention attire. When you specify business casual or business formal (or even have an ugly sweater party), you’re less likely to have employees show up dressed in after-hours clothing.

If you’re serving alcohol, avoid an open bar, issue drink tickets or hire a bartender you can trust to keep things in check. Serve good food constantly. Make sure you have options for people with food allergies and dietary restrictions.

Be aware not everyone celebrates Christmas. Make your holiday party voluntary and hold it outside of work hours. Let everyone know they’re welcome, but don’t force or require attendance.

Scheduling Conflicts

Another huge problem for employers during the holidays is that everyone wants off at the same time. It’s understandable people want to be with their families during the holidays, and often that means travel. Cold and flu season starts at the same time, further complicating issues.

Employees have lots to do with holiday shopping, entertaining and travel. Prepare to receive more time-off requests than normal. Consider using flex time as a reward, or implementing a rotating schedule for employees who complete tasks early and want to take a morning or afternoon for personal tasks.

Announce your policy for approving absences early, and set a deadline for requests. Some bosses approve based on seniority, others take a first-come-first-served approach.

Decreased Productivity

Your staff has more to do during the holidays, but you still have a business to run. Accept the fact employees are going to be distracted, and then make plans to create fresh energy and engagement.

Consider planning office competitions based around the holidays, with time off or small perks for teams who reach their goals. Boost morale with more flexible holiday hours. Publicly recognize and reward employees who give 100 percent every day of the year.

Not Enough Employees

Sometimes office problems happen because there’s too much work and not enough people to keep up. It’s not too late to hire seasonal or temporary help to get you through the busy 2019 holidays. Contact Brelsford Personnel to find out more.

TACC Celebrates Community Achievement at Annual Event

TACC Celebrates Community Achievement at Annual Event

For many East Texans there are months left in the year, but not for the Tyler Area Chamber of Commerce (TACC). Their fiscal year ends on September 30, so their year just came to a close. They celebrated with an annual event recognizing Chamber accomplishments and presenting awards to community members.

I Choose Tyler

The event was held at Harvey Convention Center and catered by Stanley’s and Roast Social Kitchen. The banquet’s theme was “I Choose Tyler,” and that message resonated throughout the evening. “A lot of people come to Tyler for a specific reason,” Henry Bell, TACC’s Chief Operating Officer said, “And they end up staying because it’s just such a great place.”

Tyler Area Chamber of Commerce’s mission is to encourage an environment where businesses can thrive and to enhance both economic well-being and quality of life in the area. Over 2,500 businesses, organizations and individuals make up the association. Amazingly, it is the fourth largest Chamber in the state of Texas.

This Year’s Highlights

The Chamber of Commerce is made up of subcommittees that enhance different aspects of community life and business development. They’re responsible for why so many people do choose Tyler for their place to live and do business.

Big things happened this past year because of each committee member’s commitment to making Tyler even better. Skip Ogle, Chairman of the Board for 2018-2019, introduced a video highlighting accomplishments like these:

  • The Aviation Committee celebrated the completion of Runway 422 at Tyler Pounds Regional Airport, part of ongoing improvements to that side of the facility. On July 2, Frontier Airlines started offering nonstop flights to Denver, connecting Tyler to a second transportation hub.
  • The Energy Committee offered the 2019 Energy Summit of Northeast Texas, bringing key industry experts to Tyler. They also continued to stimulate area job growth by establishing the Federation for Advanced Manufacturing Education (FAME) chapter. This partnership encourages apprenticeships between area businesses and educational institutions.
  • The Surface Transportation Committee worked to improve the transportation infrastructure around Tyler alongside NetRMA, the Texas Department of Transportation, Smith County and the City of Tyler. Work is ongoing in places like Old Jacksonville, Loop 49, Rhones Quarter Road and Paluxy.
  • The Business Development Council hosted multiple expos to support Tyler area businesses. Their program “School is Cool” provided supplies and services for thousands of students before classes started this year.
  • The Business Education Council focused efforts connecting local businesses and the area economy. The program matched city and local business leaders with Tyler ISD high school seniors to work together to ensure senior success.
  • Visit Tyler reported last year visitors spent $386 million in Tyler. The 2019 Azalea Trail alone had an economic impact of almost $1.9 million.

Business of the Year Awards

The Tyler Area Chamber of Commerce presents the Business of the Year Award to local organizations that support TACC’s mission to enhance the business environment, economic well-being and quality of life for the Tyler area. Cooperative Teacher’s Credit Union received the Small Business of the Year Award because of their heart for giving, community involvement and support for the Chamber Education Committee.

Mewbourne Oil Company received the 2018-2019 Large Business of the Year Award. TACC commended the organization’s high standards in hiring and its support of local events.

TACC Award Winners

The Tyler Area Chamber of Commerce presented several awards at the evening event. Bob Garrett, an East Texas real estate developer and president of Fair Oil Company of Texas received the T.B. Butler Award, an award Butler Publishing Company has presented to outstanding leaders since 1929. Friends and associates describe Garrett as a man of his word, who can handle any challenge and do so with integrity.

The W.C. Windsor Award goes to Tyler’s most outstanding person under the age of 40. This year’s recipient was Lindsey Shaver Harrison, director of sales for medical device company NanoVibronix. Harrison founded flippingtyler.com, is a board member of the Children’s Advocacy Center, serves as public relations chair of the Cattle Baron’s Committee and has been involved in several volunteer organizations.

Volunteer of the Year Award

Tyler Area Chamber of Commerce also presented our own Gates Brelsford with the Volunteer of the Year Award. Gates has been the Team Lead for the Energy Summit of Northeast Texas for several years. The March 2019 Energy Summit had a record of 450 attendees and 35 sponsors. The Energy Summit exists to bring top industry experts to East Texas and focuses on:

  • Job creation in Northeast Texas
  • New investment in energy resources
  • Educating the general public about the benefits of the energy industry

For more on this year’s energy summit, see our 2019 Energy Summit of Northeast Texas Recap.

Live Love Tyler

The Chamber welcomed June Cheatham as the 2019-2020 Chair of the Board. She challenged attendees to ponder what it means to live in Tyler, to love Tyler and to live out your love on a daily basis. “To love Tyler is to love its people,” she said, “To commit to its people…which each of you do on a daily basis as you either own, operate or work for entities that provide jobs and stability for the people of Tyler.”

At Brelsford Personnel, that’s a commitment we take seriously. We feel privileged to be part of the Tyler Area Chamber of Commerce and our community. We look forward to serving area residents and members of the business community in the year ahead.

Personal Tragedy in the Workplace – Showing Support While Respecting Privacy

Personal Tragedy in the Workplace – Showing Support While Respecting Privacy

When you spend 40 hours a week with the same people, you share success and stress, trials and triumph. You get close. But when someone experiences a personal tragedy, it can be hard to know how to react.

When a co-worker experiences a death in the family, divorce, serious illness or other difficult circumstance, you want to show you care, but you also don’t want to overstep boundaries. They may take some time off, but that’s not long enough to heal from a crisis. Here are tips for showing support.

Stay Away from These Phrases

When you don’t know what to say, it’s tempting to use phrases you’ve heard before. Avoid statements like the following:

  • I know exactly how you feel.
  • At least now he/she is in a better place.
  • Everything happens for a reason.
  • You can always try again.
  • God never gives us more than we can handle.

Your goal is to be supportive and say the right things, but those statements minimize what they’re going through. Plus, they’ve probably heard the same clichés from others, and it gets harder each time they’re repeated.

Avoid Comparisons

There may come a time when you can share what happened to you, but immediately after the tragedy, try not to compare what happened to your co-worker to what you or someone else you know experienced. Also, try not to offer advice unless your co-worker asks for it.

Every loss happens differently, and mourning is an individual process. You can let them know you experienced a similar loss and you’re available if they want to talk, then just leave it at, “I can’t imagine what this is like for you.”

But Don’t Avoid Your Co-Worker

Every time you see them, you hurt for what they’re going through. You don’t want to say or do the wrong thing, so it’s tempting to try and stay away. There’s nothing you can do to “fix” what they’re feeling, but you can let them know they’re not alone and that you care.

When you have a chance to talk in private, make eye contact and offer your condolences. Listen if they want to talk, and if not just be there. Send them a text every so often to let them know they’re in your thoughts.

Mail a Card

Tangible evidence of support matters. Buy a greeting card with an appropriate message and give everyone at the office time to write a brief message, then drop it in the mail. That allows everyone to express their concern and willingness to be available. Written words get read again and again. They end up as keepsakes that later, when the person has had time to heal, are evidence of the people who were there for them at the very worst times.

Start a Meal Train

It’s almost always helpful to bring food, and believe it or not, there’s an app for that. Meal Train has a free plan that allows you to create an online meal calendar, designate where co-workers should drop off food, warn about food allergies or meal preferences and send invites through email or social media. People who don’t cook but still want to participate can show support with a gift card or restaurant meal.

There’s no timeline for healing from a tragedy, and the process is difficult. Your co-worker will appreciate your support and concern throughout the process.

Administrative Assistant Skills That Make You Stand Out

Administrative Assistant Skills That Make You Stand Out

Clients of Brelsford Personnel are always looking for the best administrative assistants. Our agency seeks out quality administrative talent to place with top East Texas employers. But what exactly does it mean to be the best? Take a look at these key skills to find out if you’re a good fit for one of our administrative assistant jobs.

Communication

Administrative assistants tend to be one of the first faces a client will see. All communication – whether it is on the phone, over email, or in person – should be clear, concise, and direct. Administrators rely on their assistants to communicate with company employees at every level, so a friendly and professional communication style can keep things running smoothly.

Another essential part of communication is body language. For example, maintaining an open stance by not crossing your arms demonstrates you are approachable. Keeping eye contact and wearing a friendly expression are also indispensable parts of this skill.

When you understand and manage your own emotions and positively influence those of others, you show strong emotional intelligence. Your strength enables quick decision-making and simplifies conflict resolution.

Effective Time Management

Would people who know you describe you as someone who sets goals, prioritizes, and plans ahead? Many recruiters are searching for a candidate with exceptional time-management skills. Time management is a vital attribute for any employee, but especially for administrative assistants.

The key is to start every day with a clear idea of what needs to be done. That means planning. Make a to-do list or outline a plan to make the most of your day. Anticipating solutions to common hiccups helps work move more efficiently. A good administrative assistant instinctively looks for problems and addresses them before they are noticed.

Strong candidates also have a laser-like focus. They know how to filter out distractions and stay focused on the task at hand. Their time management skills lead to higher productivity and job satisfaction. For more on time management, see our article 3 Time-Wasting Habits to Break Now.

Attention to Detail

Paying attention to the little things can mean the difference between an average employee and an amazing one. It’s the details that count. When you spot even the minor mistakes, your work is dependably accurate.

This skill requires good listening, meticulous observation, and exceptional patience. Even small mistakes can have major consequences, but detail-oriented administrative assistants thrive.

Confidentiality

Administrative assistants should handle all information with extreme confidentiality. One of the most important parts of your job is safeguarding the information you receive about clients, the company and other employees.

Sharing this information can lead to a loss of revenue. It can ruin relationships and cause big accounts to go to the competition. A confidentiality breach can turn into a media nightmare and ruin a company’s good name forever. If an administrative assistant leaks information their company doesn’t just lose business, they break trust.

Most companies have regulations explaining what you can and can’t discuss outside of work. These are often outlined in the employee handbook, so if you get the job make learning them a high priority. No matter where you apply for an administrative assistant job, recruiters are looking for employees that know how to be prudent with their words.

Organization

Organization and adaptability are must-have skills for administrative assistants. It’s not just about who has the cleanest desk or powers through a to-do list fastest. These are the skills you’ll need to promote a positive working environment:

  • Problem-solving – This goes back to effective communication. A strong administrative assistant can work with others to solve tough problems in an organized fashion.
  • Physical Work Space – Having stacks of loose papers or personal items piled all over your desk sends a bad message to an employer.
  • Professional attire — A person’s physical appearance indicates to employers the care and attention to detail with which they approach their work. Clean, professional clothing can go a long way.
  • Planning and Scheduling – Your ability to juggle deadlines and appointments makes you an asset. When you take the initiative to complete tasks, it shows employers that you’re looking out for their interests. In the long run, your organization signals you’re ready for more responsibility.
  • Prioritization – A strong administrative assistant knows the difference between a high-priority task and a low-priority task. He or she always responds accordingly.

For an administrative assistant, these traits are key ingredients of a productive and fulfilling job experience. When you apply and when you go through the interview process, employers are evaluating your organization skills. Once you get the job, you won’t last long if you don’t show adaptability and oversight.

Problem Solving

How do you respond to the unexpected? For administrative assistants, new situations arise quickly that may require rapid-fire decisions and clear knowledge of the workplace.

Sometimes events derail your day and ruin your plans. Getting off-track can be difficult, but the best administrative assistants know how to quickly alter course and minimize disruptions after new problems arise. Recruiters are searching for employees who can adapt to change quickly and efficiently.

Being adaptable makes the workplace more cohesive. It’s a must-have skill for your position, and one that will make you stand out as a driven and exemplary employee.

The Importance of Experience

Being an administrative assistant requires diverse talents, but your company needs those skills to run smoothly. If you are self-motivated and a team player who is comfortable using a phone or computer, this might be the job for you. Administrative assistant jobs may include responsibilities like handling phone calls, answering mail, managing filing systems, and maintaining office supply inventories. You’ll probably also be required to type, enter data, and manage schedules and appointments.

Always check the job posting to see what is the minimum amount of experience required. It’s also good to be upfront about proficiency in programs you will interface with like Word, Excel, and QuickBooks.

If this article describes you, you may be perfect for the job of administrative assistant. Feel free to check out our online job postings for your next career opportunity.

What Not to Wear to Your Next Job Interview

What Not to Wear to Your Next Job Interview

Your resume got you in the door, and you’re already thinking about how landing the job will make your life better. The next step is the interview. The person you’re meeting with will be watching everything you say and do to evaluate whether you’re the right fit for the job. If you wear any of the following, the first impression you make might not be what you hope.

Wild and Flashy Attire

When you select your interview attire, stay away from loud colors and wild prints. No cheetah or tropical print, no neon colors, and no large logos or slogans. It’s better to stick with simple and classic.

That goes for accessories as well. Avoid big earrings and chunky necklaces and bracelets. Nothing you wear should jingle when you move.

Don’t put anything flashy on your head. Big hair bows and beanies are distracting. Also, leave your sunglasses and headphones in the car.

Makeup can be wild and flashy too. It’s better to wear light, neutral colors so your interviewer remembers your intelligence, not your eye shadow.

Strong Scents

Don’t wear heavy perfume or cologne. If you’re not sure how scented you are when you apply your favorite fragrance, ask someone you trust or skip it altogether when you go for your interview.

Tight or Baggy Clothes

How your clothes fit matters. If you have to struggle to get into any part of your outfit, choose something else. You’ll look much more professional if you avoid attire that’s form-fitting. Also, stay away from clothing that shows cleavage, your midriff or tattoos and body piercings.

You can go too far in the other direction as well. Baggy pants and oversized tops can make the wearer look sloppy. The interviewer could infer your work might be sloppy too.

Uncomfortable Shoes

Flip flops are too casual, but they aren’t the only type of shoes you should avoid. Choose something simple, professional and basic. You can’t predict how much walking you’ll do before, during and after your interview, so it’s best to avoid new shoes or tall heels. If your feet hurt, it’s harder to focus on the interview.

Anything Transparent

Don’t wear clothing that has material you can see through, no matter how trendy it is. Undergarments should never be visible when you go for an interview. Also, don’t wear clothing that has holes in it.

The best idea when planning interview attire is to research the company you hope to work for. Check their social media pages to see if they have pictures of employees at work, or drive by the parking lot a few days before your interview. See how current workers dress, then choose attire that’s slightly more formal than what you see.

At Brelsford Personnel, we want candidates to have all the tools they need for success. For more on typically acceptable attire, visit our resources page.

Summer Jobs in East Texas

Summer Jobs in East Texas

Some people think summer is just about hot days at the lake, leisure and vacation. Others view the season as an opportunity to make extra income. Teachers have a few months to supplement their salary with seasonal work. High school and college students can take advantage of time away from the books. Retirees may choose to work a few months to pocket additional income.

Sometimes Tyler seasonal employment even provides an opportunity that lasts into fall. These summer jobs are available now in East Texas.

Food Server

Restaurants often experience a traffic surge during summertime. The days are longer, schedules are packed with summer activities and no one wants to heat up the kitchen. Food server jobs provide summer income. They also help workers develop customer service skills, multitasking abilities, situational awareness and active listening.

Back of house food service employees prepare dishes and clean up after. Front of house employees interact with diners. Small restaurants might ask staff to do a little bit of everything. Look for area restaurants with a “Now Hiring” sign in the window, but also think outside the box. Places like Christus Trinity Mother Francis and Tyler Junior College also frequently advertise a need for food service workers in their cafeterias.

Camp Counselor

Summer day camps provide childcare and activities for kids when the school year is no longer in swing. East Texas has several, and they all need camp counselors and childcare workers. A camp counselor job allows workers to mentor kids and spend the summer in a fast-paced, high-energy environment. You’ll hone transferrable skills like communication, leadership and conflict resolution. Here are a few of the summer camps hiring counselors in East Texas:

Retail Store Jobs

Area retailers are always looking for good employees, whether it’s seasonal or otherwise. If you’re looking for a Tyler summer job hiring now, here are a few of the roles you might want to consider.

  • Cashier – Use the store’s point-of-sale system to check customers out. You’ll need a positive attitude, solid math skills and good interpersonal communication abilities.

  • Stock clerk – If you excel at keeping things neat and organized and have strong attention to detail, apply for a summer job as a stock clerk. Your store will rely on you to keep shelves full, put back scattered merchandise and track inventory.

  • Merchandiser – Merchandisers set up product displays strategically to draw attention to featured products and sales. Workers need strong design and organizational skills.

  • Retail associate – These workers answer questions, help customers find what they’re looking for and act as a general store ambassador.

Look for summer retail jobs at places like Dillards, Wal-Mart, Sam’s Club, Best Buy and as well as smaller retail stores.

Summer Internships

High school and college students can use the summer break to learn skills that could help them land a more professional role later. Some summer internships are on a volunteer basis, but many of them are paid. If you’re a student, visit your school’s career center to find local opportunities in your chosen field. It also doesn’t hurt to make a dream list and go directly to company websites.

Summer is also a good time for job shadowing, where an individual works alongside professionals to gain knowledge in a particular field. Financial corporations, legal firms, manufacturing facilities, medical institutions and other industries sometimes offer job-shadowing for qualified candidates. Observers or interns get an inside look at what it’s like to work for one particular employer and gather firsthand information on must-have skills.

Positions Available Now

At Brelsford Personnel, we match East Texas job seekers with top area employers. Here are just a few of the positions we’re hiring for now. (They are not summer jobs.)

View other available positions when you visit our job board today.

How to Improve Your People Skills At Work

How to Improve Your People Skills At Work

A huge part of how you feel about your job involves the people you work with. Positive work relationships will make you look forward to doing what you do. When the workplace contains undercurrents of tension and dissatisfaction, everyone suffers.

The beginning of a new year is a great time to work on building positive, effective relationships with co-workers and administrators. You may not be able to be friends with everyone but there are always steps you can take to strengthen the work relationships you have while forging new ones.

Evaluate and Improve Soft Skills

Building better relationships doesn’t start with your co-workers and managers. It begins inside when you take an objective look at your soft skills.

Hard skills are the ones you trained for. They’re things like your certifications, degrees, second languages and the number of words per minute you type. Soft skills are harder to measure. Here are a few examples:

  • Leadership
  • Problem solving ability
  • Strong work ethic
  • Strategic thinking
  • Competitiveness
  • Calmness under pressure
  • Compassionate listening

You may not have put them on your resume, but they’re crucial to building strong work relationships. Identify your strengths and weaknesses and look for ways to improve.

Steps for Better Communication Skills

No matter where you are on the communication skills spectrum, there’s room for improvement. You have the power to build better relationships when you make your goals specific and measurable.

Speak positively about your co-workers and administrators. It’s not kissing up, it’s being encouraging. Look for three ways to provide positive feedback every work day. Set a reminder on your phone to note whether you met your goal before you go home.

Ask questions. If you know your co-worker has a skill you’re curious about, give them a chance to share how they learned it. When working as a team, pause and ask other members what they think, and listen to what they say.

Express appreciation. Thank at least one person every day for something they do. Be on the lookout for little things that might normally go unnoticed. When presenting teamwork, let others hear you be appreciative for their individual contributions. Share credit when things go right, but when they don’t, avoid the temptation to place blame.

Avoid gossip like the plague. Office politics kill relationships. If you have a problem with someone, speak to them in private. If the situation doesn’t involve you, don’t add fuel to the fire by passing on information.

Improving work relationships takes consistent effort, but it’s worth it. When you make an intentional effort to pour good into the lives of those around you, it creates a ripple effect that will spread throughout your entire organization.