Create Your Best Job – Start Here

Create Your Best Job – Start Here

Don’t Send Resumes Until You’ve Adjusted Your Mindset

The “new normal,” as it is termed, is in fact a “harsh reality.” Unemployment is radically higher than it has been in recent years. The economy is struggling to recover from a global recession, COVID-19 shutdowns, oil industry woes and disrupted international trade. Employers are cautious as the Texas economy reopens, and many of them are only slowly taking on new staff. Jobs are scarce.

If you lost your job, you could have a challenging road ahead. Government unemployment assistance has helped, but that won’t last forever. If you wait until the checks stop coming, you will be applying for work at the same time as many of other Americans who are in the same predicament.

At Brelsford Personnel, we’re committed to matching as many East Texans as possible with area employers who do need staff or might soon. To give candidates their best chance at getting back to work, we’ve put together this series with tips on how to experience success in not just getting work, but finding your best job, so you can start living your best life. The first, and possibly most vital step is to start with a self-check.

Why It Matters

Being without work when you need income is one of the most difficult situations to be in, even in the best of times. These are not the best of times. There are fewer jobs available and there is more competition for the ones that are out there.

However, there’s something you can control that will give you a powerful edge – your attitude. Before you start your job search, get your head in the right place and determine what you desire the outcome of that search to be.

Setting Your Attitude for Success

Someone once said your attitude is only 10 percent of what happens to you and 90 percent of how you react to it (or don’t react to it). Start your job search by determining to have and maintain a positive attitude toward the process. Replace negative thoughts with positive thoughts like these:

  • There is an opportunity out there for me. Each experience I have along the way brings me one step closer to finding my next opportunity.
  • I am qualified and talented.
  • The positive choices and attitudes I have today will shape my future.

Your mindset determines your reality. If you listen to fear and doubt, you’ll become discouraged and lose confidence in yourself. However, if you intentionally fill your mind with positive thoughts, you’ll be able to face each day, each challenge, and each potential opportunity with confidence.

How To Find Your Dream Job

Last year, a Gallup report found that 60 percent of Americans felt they were in mediocre or bad jobs. That’s a pretty significant dissatisfaction rate, and far from a best job situation. While right now you might be thinking that any job would be a good job, but wouldn’t it be better if you could find one you really enjoyed and was best suited for you?

Instead of listening to your fears and uncertainties, look within yourself to refocus on the type of work that makes the most of your skills and talents to keep you happy and fulfilled. Take the time to mentally re-visit each of your past jobs you have held in your career, as well as your education and coursework. Then jot down answers to the following questions about your jobs:

  • What aspect of the job did you enjoy?
  • What functions of the job did you excel at?
  • What functions of the job were a challenge?
  • What salary and compensation did you earn?
  • What was the company culture like and did you thrive in it?
  • What was your boss like, and did they bring out the best in you?
  • What would you have liked to do more of?

If you struggle coming up with some of the answers, keep coming back to the questions. This is your opportunity to gain deeper insight into yourself and what inspires you in your career. You can find true, lasting career satisfaction, and turn a difficult situation into a chance at a happier future. But to create that future, you have to define it and know what you want it to look like.

Your Powerful, Personal Statements

If you write down answers to the above questions, you should end up with a good understanding of what you will be happy with. Use the results to create a positive picture of what you are looking for. Begin to envision your life as you live out that outcome.

Place your statements somewhere you can read it every day. Come back to it. When you don’t feel like looking for a job, or if you experience setbacks, read it more frequently. Recognize that as long as you have, or develop, the needed skills and qualifications, that your future is within your reach.

Check back soon for more in our series on how to create the future you want by finding your best job. Until then, browse our online job postings to see East Texas jobs that are available today.

Everything You Need to Know Before Your Next Video Interview

Everything You Need to Know Before Your Next Video Interview

Video interviews used to be just one tool in a hiring manager or recruiter’s toolbox. Since the start of the Coronavirus pandemic, they might have become one of the most important ones. That isn’t going to change any time soon. If you’re looking for a job, give yourself the best chance of success by preparing for your online interview ahead of time.

The most common type of online interview is the video call, where the interviewer uses Zoom, Facetime, Skype or a similar platform to interact with you just like they would during an in-person interview. Some companies also might ask you to make a recorded video of yourself answering a series of questions.

Either way, candidates are sometimes caught off guard by how their stress level skyrockets during a video interview. Something about a camera makes you feel under intense scrutiny, even more “on the spot” than you would be during an in-person interview. Like with any other type of interview, preparation is the key to minimizing nerves and showing yourself at your best.

Preparing Your Video Interview Background

Choose a quiet spot you can completely close off from noise and distractions. Make the background as plain as possible.

With an in-person interview, the person you’re talking to is familiar with the surroundings so they’re not a distraction. However, through video you expose your interviewer to a completely new environment. You don’t want them to be distracted by what’s in the background. Instead, you want them to focus on you and what you bring to the table.

Everything You Need to Know Before Your Next Video Interview

If there’s a lot to look at in the background, their eyes are going to roam all over the screen instead of looking at you. It’s harder to make a strong first impression and harder to keep their attention. Your décor could prevent them from recognizing your skills.

To keep that from happening, seat yourself against a blank wall or other monochromatic backdrop. Then, let in as much natural light as possible and turn on the other lights in the room to ensure your face is brightly lit. Consider placing a lamp on either side of your monitor to minimize dark shadows and harsh lines.

Avoid sitting in front of a window, or you’ll just be a dark silhouette on the screen. Sit in a chair with a straight back, not on the couch or in a recliner. Put your computer or phone with camera on a desk or table instead of holding it on your lap. It’s hard to look enthusiastic while lounging, hunched shoulders or a double chin.

Everything You Need to Know Before Your Next Video Interview

Remove These Distractions

Ask someone else to watch young children during your interview and turn off everything that makes noise. Silence notifications on your phone and computer.

Make sure your cat or dog can’t wander through. Even your goldfish shouldn’t be on camera, he or she is guaranteed to do something to try to steal the limelight. Turn off your overhead fan so shadows won’t flicker and your hair doesn’t blow. Make sure the dishwasher and coffee pot don’t kick in on delay start.

Don’t sit in front of anything with text. You might think your library makes you appear well-read, but it could also have your interviewer trying to read all those titles sideways instead of focus on your answers. Family photos or dishes in the background are visual clutter you can do without.

Take mirrors down temporarily so you don’t have to worry about what they might reflect during your interview. Then pre-adjust your camera so only your face, torso and a small amount of plain background are visible.

What to Wear for a Video Interview

Dress for a video interview in the same type of professional attire as you would for an in-person interview. During your company research, watch for images of employees at work and wear something similar or slightly more formal.

Just like with regular interviews, avoid loud colors and prints. If you wear jewelry, stick to just a few simple pieces. And, just like with in-person interviews, wear pants or a skirt. If you just dress from the waist up, you’re sending yourself the message it isn’t a “real” interview. You also might end up showing your interviewer more of yourself than you intend.

Best Colors to Wear for Online Interviews

Black and navy are almost always a safe bet. It’s also flattering to wear a soft, light colored shirt. White, cream and soft blues and greens can be flattering, but red, yellow and orange don’t always look good on camera.

Video Interview Makeup Tips

If you are interviewing on Zoom, Bluejeans, FaceTime or any other platform, your goal is to highlight what is best about you. If you wear makeup, aim for a natural, healthy look. Evening skin tone and darkening lashes are fine but avoid heavy or dramatic shades in your eye shadow and lipstick.

How to Prep Your Technology

If you haven’t used the meeting client, you may need to download it. Here are links for accessing some of the most frequently used video interview tools:

Google Meet doesn’t require a download, just click on the link and follow the prompts to start a meeting. GoToMeeting has a 14 day free trial, but there are a few steps to signing up. Facetime is a feature on iPhones.

Your interviewer will send you a link to find your meeting room when it is time for your actual interview, but it’s a good idea to familiarize yourself with the software before you get to that point. Ask a friend or family member if they’ll pose as your interviewer and schedule a practice session with them over the technology you’ll use when it’s time for your real online interview.

Testing 1-2

Use a desktop or laptop computer if possible, not a cell phone or tablet. A computer is more stable and will likely have a more reliable internet connection.

Video uses significantly more bandwidth than web browsing. For video conferencing, you need a stable connection of 1-4 Megabits per second. Google will run a free speed test on yours here. During your interview, ask other family members to stay off the Wi-Fi so they’re not using your bandwidth.

If you won’t be connected to power, make sure your device is fully charged. Access your camera, first and make sure you are centered in the middle of the screen.

Content Preparation

Get your mind ready using the interview tips on our resources page. Then schedule that practice video interview with your friend or family member.

Once you’ve established your connection with them, ask them how the background looks on their end, whether or not the sound is clear and how and if you appear on the monitor. Make adjustments as needed.

Provide them with these seven common interview questions and have them pose as the hiring manager. Treat it like the real deal and you’ll uncover areas you can improve and build confidence for your actual interview.

Acing Your Online Interview

If you completed the above steps, you’re ready to make a good impression during your video interview, but there are still challenges ahead. When you meet with someone face to face, it’s often easier to establish rapport than it is when talking through a screen. Before you connect, take a deep breath, relax your shoulders and connect with your most positive, confident self.

Establishing Rapport

Start with a friendly greeting and by thanking them for the opportunity. Sit up straight or lean slightly forward to express attention and interest. Mirror their talking speed, volume and energy levels. If appropriate, nod when they do, and occasionally repeat back to them or paraphrase what they say.

Eye contact matters, and it’s a little tricky to maintain it during a video interview. Because your interviewer appears on your screen, that’s where your eyes go. However, for most people, the camera is located at the top of their screen. If you focus in the middle of the monitor, you appear to be looking down.

Put a sticker behind your camera as a reminder to frequently look at the lens, essentially making eye contact with your interviewer. Don’t be put off if they don’t do the same.

If You Make a Mistake

Sometimes the unexpected happens, and if it was caught on camera mistakes can seem insurmountable. If it happens to you, don’t over-analyze while your interview is still going on or you’ll have a hard time concentrating on the remainder of the meeting. If you made a simple mistake and you can correct it, just explain you may have miscommunicated and you’d like to provide additional information.

If you’ve finished your interview and you fear it’s a make or break blunder, include a concise statement providing correct or omitted information in your follow-up email. If the problem relates to a technology malfunction, follow up with an email request to reschedule.

Wrapping Things Up

It’s common for managers near the close of an interview to ask if you have any questions. Prepare a few that show you’ve been listening during the interview, you did your research and you’re excited about the possibility of a job offer. It’s also a good idea to ask about the next steps in the process.

When it’s clear the interview is over, express your appreciation and sign off. Follow up with a thank you email and any additional information they requested.

Jobs Near Tyler Texas

Your next job might already be posted on our job board. Browse openings or submit your resume online today.

4 Indispensable Skills for a Customer Service Representative

4 Indispensable Skills for a Customer Service Representative

Customer service can make or break a business. Dimensional Research found consumers rank customer service the number one factor impacting whether or not they trust a business. When Microsoft surveyed consumers around the globe, 96 percent of them said customer service was the deciding factor in brand loyalty.

Good customer service wins trust and loyalty, but poor customer service loses business. Eighty-nine percent of consumers report they’ve switched to a competitor because they had a bad customer service experience. That’s what makes the right customer service representative indispensable to East Texas employers.

At Brelsford Personnel, those employers sometimes ask us to send them workers who will be an asset to their customer service department. Here’s what we’re looking for when we evaluate customer service representatives.

Professionalism

People don’t typically chat with, call or visit customer service because they’re having a nice day and they have positive things to say about what the company offers. They call because they have a problem and they need help. Problems make people feel confused, frustrated, angry and impatient. Often they wear those negative emotions on their sleeves.

A strong customer service representative can act professionally even in emotionally charged situations. They remain polite and friendly, even if the customer is rude. If they can’t resolve the issue or the customer’s emotions get out of control, they know when to transfer the situation to a supervisor.

Empathy

A good customer service representative can turn problems into positive interactions because they empathize with the customer. They can identify the emotions that person is feeling and remember a time they felt that way. It helps them form a connection with the person they’re helping. That connection helps the customer feel heard and eases their frustration.

Strong customer service representatives realize just having to contact support is a headache most people would rather avoid. They’re sensitive to the feelings that come from having to navigate a long phone menu or wait on hold. They make things a little better when they sincerely thank the customer for their patience and loyalty.

Good Listening

Great customer service representatives have strong listening skills that allow them to answer questions quickly. They’re attentive and engaged, even when they’ve been on the clock for hours. Customers know they’re listening because they note small details. They never sound bored or like they’re reading canned responses from a script.

Problem Solving

Sometimes there’s not an easy solution to a customer’s request. It’s not just a matter of issuing a refund or providing an exchange. That’s when a good customer service representative’s problem-solving skills become invaluable.

Consumers appreciate when support representatives take personal responsibility for their care. When you stay positive and don’t give up, customer loyalty often results.

Workers who come with all those traits are so hard to find, employers sometimes wonder if they’re unicorns. Brelsford Personnel has an extensive database with highly qualified customer service representative candidates. Learn more about what we offer employers or get in touch today.

Job Search Emotions – Surviving the Roller Coaster

Job Search Emotions - Surviving the Roller Coaster

Looking for a new job is exhilarating and exhausting, electrifying and draining. Sometimes it takes a while to find the right fit. Every time you fill out an application or submit your resume, your emotions yo-yo from hope to nervousness to frustration to excitement.

If you know what’s normal, it can help you survive the bumps and curves. Let’s look at common job search emotions, and then talk about how to make the ups and downs a little less extreme.

Normal Emotions During a Job Hunt

Whether you’re a 16-year-old applying for your very first job or a seasoned member of the East Texas workforce, these emotions are all completely normal.

  • Excitement – You’re energized by the possibility of change and ready to go find that great new job.
  • Overwhelmed – When you start to realize how many choices there are and all the work you face finding a new employer, it can feel like too much.
  • Fixation – You apply at one company that seems like a perfect fit, and suddenly all you can think about is working there. You feel like you can’t wait to hear from them and your life just might be over if they don’t offer you the job.
  • Hope – The employer calls you for more information or to request an interview. You see a potential light at the end of the job search tunnel.
  • Frustration – Time goes by and you’re tired of knocking on doors, tired of waiting to hear something, just fed up with the whole process.
  • Impatience – You’ve lost track of how many times you checked your email, voicemail and text messages. It feels like you should have heard something by now.
  • Deliriously happy and relieved – You finally hear you got the job.

Tips for Staying Focused

Just recognizing what you’re feeling is normal will go a long way toward making things easier. Most people connect what they do for work with who they are as an individual, so it’s understandable if you feel unsettled when things are up in the air.

If you’re out of work, treat job hunting as an actual job. Make sure your resume is mistake-proof and accurately showcases your skills. Use your contacts to find openings that might not yet be posted. Apply for more than one position at a time so you have a chance of hearing back from multiple employers.

Recognize when you don’t get the response you hope for, most of the time it isn’t because you aren’t likeable or skilled at what you do. Sometimes organizations promote from within. Other times they’re looking for something specific that wasn’t on your resume. When you stay positive and keep moving forward, eventually you’ll find the right fit.

Work With a Staffing Agency

At Brelsford Personnel, you’re not just a list of qualifications on a piece of paper. Our primary mission is to provide truly personal staffing services. We love what we do for work, and we thrive on helping others find ways to do the same. Search our open positions and see if we can help you find the job of your dreams.

Virus Proof Your Workplace in 4 Steps

Virus Proof Your Workplace in 4 Steps

The news is full of unsettling information about Coronavirus spread, and that’s likely to escalate in the next few weeks. But the truth is, there are almost always germs floating around, and no one wants to risk getting sick.

Bosses and managers can emphasize good habits and show workers they care about their overall well-being by prioritizing good health. Protect against both bacterial infections and viruses in the workplace when you follow these steps.

Educate Everyone

It’s okay for them to think of you as the company germophobe if it leads to better health. At your next meeting, spend a few minutes giving a refresher course on how microscopic organisms like bacteria, viruses, fungi and protozoa spread. Then explain how regular, thorough hand washing kills them.

Most germs, including Coronavirus, spread through moisture droplets that pass from person to person. Sneezes, coughs, saliva, even breath can transfer infection. Since with many illnesses, hosts can be asymptomatic and still contagious, employees should be proactive about guarding themselves and their co-workers from the risk of infection.

Supply Germ Fighting Products

It doesn’t do any good to cover your mouth when you cough or sneeze if after you do, you touch doorknobs, light switches and shared computers. It’s better to catch those germs in a tissue, but employees don’t always have much warning before a coughing or sneezing fit. Help them out when you stock up on tissues and place them where they’re easy to reach.

Place hand sanitizer right next to the tissues. Grab a squirt now and then yourself to subtly encourage others to do the same.

Pass out packets of sanitizing wipes so staff can disinfect their personal workspaces. If employees eat lunch in a breakroom or other shared area, leave a tub of wipes there as well.

Encourage Sick Staff to Stay Home

Some employees don’t call in when they aren’t feeling well because they’re afraid it will reflect negatively on their performance. Others feel like they need to “tough it up” and power through, so they take medication to mask symptoms and report to work as usual.

However, it’s better for everyone if sick employees stay home. They’ll get well faster and won’t risk infecting their co-workers. Make sure your team knows you encourage them to take time off if they get sick.

Make Disinfecting Easier

Virus and bacteria-laden droplets can stay infectious for hours, even sometimes days after they land on surfaces. Disinfectant kills them, but if your workplace is cluttered, they have plenty of places to lurk in the mess.

Consider requiring employees to clear their desks at the end of the day and to not leave personal items in shared work areas. That will make it easier for your cleaning crew to thoroughly disinfect.

When everyone works together, germs don’t have a chance to spread. You significantly reduce everyone’s risk of getting sick at the office.

5 Signs Your Job Interview Went Well

5 Signs Your Job Interview Went Well

You were exhilarated when you walked out the door, but almost as soon as you got in the car, you started replaying the interview in your head. Now you’ve been over and over the questions and answers, looking for clues you might receive a job offer soon.

Often, the way an interviewer responds gives hints into which way they’re leaning. They may still be considering other qualified applicants, but these are signs the interviewer thinks you might be the one they’re looking for.

The Interview Was Long

If you went in expecting to spend 30 minutes answering the standard interview questions and came out two hours later, that’s an extremely positive sign. If the recruiter or hiring manager spent a lot of their time with you, they think your resume, experience and personality indicate you might have what it takes. They’re trying to get to know you better so they can feel good about making an offer.

Your Interviewer Introduced You to the Team

In a similar way, if you were scheduled to meet with one person and during the interview things changed, that’s a good sign. They might say, “Hey, if you have a few extra minutes, I’d like you to meet Sam, Frank and Sherry,” then introduce you to other members of management or of the team you’d be working with.

It’s even better if they give you additional information about those other people. If they say, “Frank likes football too,” or, “Sherry won the graphic artist competition last year,” they’re trying to get you to connect with them, and them with you.

You Connected With the Interviewer

If you felt like there was an immediate rapport with your interviewer, that’s a sign your interview went well. You might have discovered you have things in common. They might have gone off script and stopped asking traditional questions and started asking detailed questions about your previous job experience.

Or, they might have indicated their positive response with body language – leaning toward you, nodding to show they’re interested, making good eye contact and staying engaged with your answers.

They Try to Sell You The Job

One sign a job offer might be on the way is when your interviewer spends a lot of time explaining the benefits of the job you’re applying for. When they talk up the great bonuses people received last quarter, how the company offers unique amenities or where they go for the company retreat every year, they’re hoping you’ll consider accepting their offer.

The Interviewer Talks About Next Steps

It’s always a positive sign when the interviewer plans for the next stages of the process. They might ask how much notice you need to give at your current position or how soon you could start. It’s also a plus if they say you’ll hear from them within a specific time frame.

The next step in applying for jobs available through Brelsford Personnel is to submit your resume. Browse our job postings to get started.

How to Know if Job Hopping is Hurting Your Opportunities

How to Know if Job Hopping is Hurting Your Opportunities

Nobody ever sets out to bounce around between employers, sometimes life just works out that way. If you’ve made a few job changes and you have a reasonable explanation, it might not hurt, but if it’s a pattern, it can be a red flag to employers.

So how do you know if recent job changes are keeping you from finding a better job? How much change is too much? Is there anything you can do if you’ve made several moves in the recent past? Read on to find answers.

How Much is Too Much?

Last year the Bureau of Labor Statistics released the results of a national longitudinal survey that sheds some light on averages. They looked at people born between 1957 and 1964, individuals who have had plenty of time to experience job movement. On average, they held 12.3 jobs after they turned 18. They were employed 78 percent of the time. When they were working, 75 percent of their jobs ended in fewer than five years.

In contrast, people born in the 1980s had worked at an average of six jobs by the time they reached their 26th birthday. People are changing jobs more frequently than they did in the past, especially younger workers.

Some movement is expected. Employers aren’t looking as much at your overall number of jobs as the time you’ve spent at each one. When employers see you’ve had multiple jobs and you’ve been at each of them for a year or less, that’s when job hopping becomes a problem.

How Long Should You Stay at a Job?

The Bureau of Labor Statistics published averages for that too. In a 2018 survey, median employee tenure was 4.3 years. Most of the time, older workers stayed longer in one position (an average of 10 years for those between 55 and 64), and younger workers moved sooner (workers between 25 and 34 changed at about 2.8 years). It’s not a problem if you quit one job soon after your hire date, what concerns employers is when quitting becomes a pattern.

It could hurt your chances of getting a new position if you quit before your one year anniversary unless you have a good reason. Employers will understand if you had to move when your spouse got transferred or if your company shut down, but if you changed frequently because you were bored or you didn’t like your co-workers, they could feel you’re not going to stick around at their company either.

What You Can Do at Your Next Interview

If you’re looking for a new job because you feel like your current situation isn’t working for you, take a hard look at what you don’t like now and what you want for your future. If you’re looking for a company with more advancement opportunities, better technology, a more flexible schedule or some other benefits, only apply with employers who offer what you’re looking for. Then don’t turn in your notice with your current boss until you’ve found a job that will be a long term fit.

Ask questions at your next interview to learn about the benefits, opportunities and culture of the company you’re considering. Let your interviewer lead, but look for signs you could be happy working there long-term. If you jump into a new role just thinking short-term, you might find yourself unhappy again in a few months, but with a little patience and research, you could end up on a rewarding career path.

Brelsford Personnel has positions with the opportunity for long-term career growth, and we take the time to talk with candidates about their career objectives. On our website you’ll find resume writing tips, dress code guidelines for the job search and interview tips to help you land a job you’ll be happy with for years to come.

East Texas Jobs for High School Graduates

East Texas Jobs for High School Graduates

It’s exciting and frightening to graduate high school. The future is up to you, and there are critical decisions ahead. We’ve made a list of job ideas for East Texas high school graduates to help you start planning what comes next.

East Texas Jobs for College Bound Grads

One of the great things about living in the Tyler area is the higher education opportunities available. If you plan to attend college classes at UT Tyler or Tyler Junior College for the fall of 2020, you’ll need work that fits your school schedule. Flexibility is a priority, because your class schedule will change from one semester to the next.

For most students, that means nine-to-five, full-time employment won’t work. Work study or student assistant jobs are available through TJC and UT Tyler for students who have completed a FAFSA and demonstrate financial need. If you qualify, work study jobs offer flexible hours and a chance to earn experience and references that will help once you finish your degree.

If you prefer to work off campus, there are a wide range of job choices for college students near Tyler. Food service is a popular choice because afternoon and evening hours work well with the typical morning class schedule, and tips at Tyler restaurants can be pretty good. Driving for a ridesharing app can be an evening and weekend money-maker if you’re over 21. Area vendors are almost always looking to hire retail associates. It’s also a good idea to check Brelsford Personnel’s online job postings to see if we have temp positions that match your qualifications.

Jobs That Don’t Require a Degree

Many skilled trades are beginning to experience shortages as Baby Boomers age out of the work force, and that could mean opportunity for East Texas high school grads. Manpower Group found that for the seventh consecutive year, skilled trades roles were the hardest to fill. Electricians, welders, mechanics, plumbers and other occupations that require specific hands-on abilities are in demand, so qualified applicants won’t have trouble finding a job.

Tyler high school students can get a head start on a profitable, satisfying career in one of these fields while they’re still in high school at the Tyler ISD Career and Technology Center. Courses offer hands-on training, and many end in an endorsement or the knowledge they need to test for certification. That means students can enter the workforce in their desired field right after graduation. If you’re still in high school, check out the Programs of Study Guide for a wide range of choices like these:

  • Automotive Collision and Repair
  • Cosmetology
  • Culinary Arts
  • Digital Communications
  • Emergency Services
  • HVAC and Sheet Metal
  • Welding

If you’re graduating in May and you didn’t choose one of these as a career path, you still have options. TJC offers degree and certificate programs in healthcare, computer science, criminal justice, healthcare administration and more.

When You’re Not Ready to Choose a Career

Students are under a lot of pressure to choose a career that will allow them to reach their potential, use their talents, make them feel fulfilled and hopefully earn a high salary. But what if you’re about to graduate and you’re not sure what you want to do?

If you always intended to go to college, you’re just not ready to pick a major, go ahead and enroll. The first few semesters are typically general education, so you’ll have more time to choose a career while you knock out the basics.

If college isn’t for you, look for work in a field of interest. You’ll get valuable job experience while you see if that field is a good fit and decide whether or not to pursue further training in that area.

Brelsford Personnel matches qualified candidates with top Texas employers in direct hire, temp-to-hire, temporary and contract staff positions. Like our Facebook page to keep up with East Texas employment news and positions available through our staffing agency.

Change In the Wind at the 2020 Energy Summit of Northeast Texas

Change In the Wind at the 2020 Energy Summit of Northeast Texas

Mark your calendars now for the 10th annual Energy Summit of Northeast Texas on March 24. In the past decade, this event sponsored by the Tyler Area Chamber of Commerce Energy Committee has become the most well-attended and recognized regional energy conference. Here’s what you need to know about this year’s event.

What’s Changing in Texas Energy

This year’s theme is Texas Energy Matters: The Changing Face of Texas Energy. The conference has always offered the latest insights on oil and gas. Now for the first year ever, part of the focus of the Energy Summit of Northeast Texas will be on renewable energy. Consider these statistics:

  • Texas ranks number one in the nation for installed wind capacity and number of wind turbines.
  • Texas, Kansas, Iowa and Oklahoma, just four states, account for 52 percent of the nation’s wind electricity generation. Of that, Texas generates more than 25 percent.
  • The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) predicts by 2050, renewables will provide almost half the world’s electricity, with wind energy making up nearly 35 percent of that total.

Oil and gas won’t be going away anytime soon, but the mix of energy sources is changing. There’s so much room for growth in terms of renewable energy. It’s an exciting topic Energy Summit speakers will explore in-depth.

Why 10 Years of Energy Summits

The Tyler Area Chamber of Commerce Energy Committee has sponsored the Energy Summit of Northeast Texas 10 years in a row to raise awareness about the industry in general and to highlight its connection with jobs in Northeast Texas.

“Most people relate to the energy industry only when they are filling their car up with gas,” said Gates Brelsford, Chairperson for the event. “But it’s one of the most important industries in Northeast Texas. Not just in Tyler but in Longview, Kilgore, Gladewater and the surrounding areas.” As much as one in six area jobs are tied to the Texas oil and gas industry.

The impact of Texas energy spreads far beyond Northeast Texas. “We’re literally changing the future of countries” says Todd Staples, President of the Texas Oil and Gas Association and one of the event’s speakers, “because we are making affordable, reliable, clean-burning energy available for them.”

Who Will Be Speaking

At the Northeast Texas Energy Summit, this list of current speakers (to date) will address the significant changes and adaptations happening now in the industry:

  • Wayne Christian – Chair of the Railroad Commission of Texas (RRC). This state agency regulates the oil and gas industry, industry safety and surface mining. Because of RCC’s influence on oil and natural gas pricing and supply, it might be one of the most important regulatory entities in the United States.
  • Brent Bennett, Ph.D. – Energy Storage Consultant for the Texas Public Policy Foundation. The challenge when it comes to renewable energy involves storing harvested wind and solar energy and putting it into the grid. This Texas native shares his expert knowledge in utility-scale energy storage systems.
  • The Honorable Jason Isaac – This four-time State Representative is now Senior Manager and Distinguished Fellow of Life: Powered at the Texas Public Policy Foundation. He’ll speak on the topic of Raising America’s Energy IQ.
  • BP Strategic Planning Group – A representative will share with attendees The Impact of Renewables on Global Energy Demand.

Who Should Plan to Attend

The 2020 Northeast Texas Energy Summit is for anyone who has an interest in developments in the energy industry. Last year’s event had more than 450 attendees and speakers integral to the industry, with similar numbers expected this year. Event participants weren’t just from oil and gas companies, they were a broad mix of representatives from accounting firms, banks, government agencies, law firms and other business entities.

Sponsorship opportunities are still available and are a way to help raise awareness of top energy industry issues while getting your name in front of a large audience. The Conference takes place in the Green Acres Baptist Church Crosswalk Conference Center on March 24 from 10:30 to 2:00. For more information or to secure tickets, call the Tyler Chamber of Commerce at (903)592-1661.

Common Sense Rules for Texting Job Candidates

Common Sense Rules for Texting Job Candidates

Sometimes text messaging can be the most effective way to get answers when evaluating prospective employees. It seems like people are more likely to respond quickly, which speeds up the hiring process. However, it’s also a more informal form of communication, so things can get sticky if you’re not careful. Your early communication sets the tone for how you’ll interact if you offer candidates the job, so it pays to keep things professional.

Permission is Easier than Forgiveness

You may have heard it’s easier to ask forgiveness than permission, but in this case that isn’t true. Before you text job candidates, make sure they’re okay with it. Your goal is engagement, and some people just don’t like texting.

It’s okay to ask via text message. Use the candidate’s name in the initial message so if you’re texting multiple candidates at once you can keep conversations straight. Send a brief message that tells your name and job title. Ask if text messaging is a good way to get in touch or if they prefer another method. Much of the time you’ll receive a positive response and know it’s okay to continue communicating via text. If you don’t hear back, double-check the number, then assume text isn’t an acceptable way to reach them.

Keep it Simple

Text is okay for short statements and simple questions. Handle everything else via email, phone call or in person. It’s fine to text interview appointments or request additional documentation, it’s not okay to negotiate salary or talk about things that aren’t job-related.

If you start composing a text and realize it contains more than a few sentences, the topic is too complicated for messaging. Or, if you find yourself going back and forth several times with the candidate, stop and schedule a phone call or meeting.

Stay Professional

Text messages are easy to send from anywhere, so sometimes recruiters get a little too relaxed. Just because you’re texting from the coffee shop doesn’t mean your tone or grammar should be similar to what you use with friends and family members. Here are a few basic rules for staying professional.

  • Only text during business hours. In your first text conversation, it’s a good idea to let candidates know what hours you’re available by text message and to assure them you’ll respect their after-hours time as well.
  • Don’t send or ask for information that should be privacy protected or might indicate discrimination.
  • Check your spelling and punctuation. Don’t use slang, emojis or text abbreviations. Your tone should be the same as you would use for work email or in-person exchanges at the office.
  • Don’t group text candidates.
  • Reply promptly to messages you receive and end conversations when you’ve reached your goal.

Hiring Made Easier

Finding the right job candidates is challenging, but you don’t have to do it alone. Brelsford Personnel handles every step of recruiting, evaluating and interviewing so you don’t have to. Contact us today to learn more about our personal approach.