Should You Take a Temp Job When You Need a Career?

Should You Take a Temp Job When You Need a Career

Holiday hiring is starting, and some East Texans are wondering if they should take a short-term gig or hold out for something more permanent. Temp positions might last only a short time and sometimes can go longer. They also may be like an extended job interview that results in a career.

If you’re offered a short-term position should you take it? Everyone’s situation is different, so we encourage job-seekers to weigh the benefits against the risks.

A Temp Job Means Income

With a temp job, you don’t have the long-term security that comes with a permanent role. You may not be eligible for benefits or vacation time. However, you know for a set time frame what you can count on earning.

When deciding whether to accept a temp job or wait for another potential employer to call, temping pays the immediate bills.

Short-Term Can be a Good Thing

You’ve heard it said that people don’t quit their job, they quit the boss. Last year CBS News reported 51 percent of America’s workers feel disengaged because of their job responsibilities or their supervisor. Hopefully your temporary job will be a positive experience but if it isn’t, you’re not stuck.

You’ll Add Experience to Your Resume

When you have a long gap between jobs, it can look bad. A temporary position fills that gap. (Put it on your resume and indicate that it was temporary.) If you’re a college student or recent graduate, sometimes short-term employment gives you the experience you need to find something more permanent.

You Have the Opportunity to Shine

To have the best chance at making a temp job permanent, treat it like a long-term commitment. Learn as much as you can about the company and your responsibilities. Build relationships with co-workers. Show up early every day dressed for success.

One of the benefits of temping is the ability to gain experience and expose yourself to a variety of personality types and processes. Soak up as much information as you can. Whether your position leads to something more permanent or not, your new skills make you more valuable.

Be on the lookout for ways you can make an impact. If a supervisor asks you to take something on that isn’t one of your assigned tasks, show a willingness to contribute.

If you found your temporary position through Brelsford Personnel or another employment agency, we have a strong relationship with the East Texas company you’re working for. Let us know if you’re interested in a full-time position and if one is available, we can inquire on your behalf.

Become a Human Lie Detector During Recruiting

Become a Human Lie Detector During Recruiting

Sometimes what candidates say sounds a little fishy. Other times they omit key details that would probably influence your hiring decision. A bad hire is costly, so recruiters should know how to spot an untruth.

Find Their Baseline

An actual polygraph (lie detector) test works by measuring a person’s breathing, pulse, blood pressure and perspiration. Some also measure body movement. After the technician attaches sensors to the subject, they ask simple questions to establish what is normal for that person. Try doing a similar evaluation the next time you conduct an interview.

Start with low-stress questions like how long it took them to get to your office or how they heard about the position. Notice how they sit in their chair, how they breathe and what their eyes do when they’re comfortable. Since you’re interviewing them for a job not interrogating them for murder, candidates probably aren’t going to break a sweat when they lie, but they might show subtle changes in body language.

Signs to Watch For

There’s a myth that when people are right handed, they look to the right when they’re telling the truth and look to the left when they tell a lie. Unfortunately it’s not that simple. Each person is different. Watch for deviations from the baseline in these areas.

  • Speech – When people feel nervous their pulse speeds up and sometimes their throat gets tight. Their voice might have a higher pitch when they give an invented response. If they pause frequently or keep clearing their throat, they might be stalling while they try to think of a response.

 

  • Body language – If your candidate was calm for the first part of the interview and they suddenly start shifting in their chair, shuffling their feet or fidgeting with their hands or clothing, pay extra attention to their words. If they were animated for most of the conversation and suddenly become still, that might also signal dishonesty.

 

  • Micro-expressions – Sometimes you see a flicker of emotion that happens so quickly you question if it was ever there in the first place. Learn to trust your gut. If you asked a question and saw a split second of panic, fear, concern or irritation, listen very closely to what comes next.

Keep in mind that it’s natural to be nervous during an interview. When you suspect an untruth, ask more questions until you feel you’ve either given the candidate a chance to talk through their anxiety or give more evidence they’re being dishonest.

Listen to that inner voice that says there might be something going on. Make a note to fact check before you make a final decision.

Grammar Giveaways

Honest responses tend to use first person pronouns and be rich in details. When someone is lying, they have to invent their response on the fly. The answer might be vague and use second or third person pronouns as they unconsciously distance themselves from their lie. They also might add qualifiers to make the story seem more impressive than it is. Compare these two responses:

“I once worked for a group of real estate professionals who wanted to improve their online presence. Their mobile load speed was slow, they had old information on their website, data just wasn’t arranged logically. They wanted to be involved in the improvement process. So I sat down with their team. They have this conference room with huge windows and we used those as a work surface. We put all their site elements on post-it notes and used that to make a sitemap.”

That response has first person pronouns and details like the post-it notes that indicate it’s a genuine memory. A dishonest response might be more like this:

“There were these helpful people at a company who really contributed to what was done. They had a lot of ideas for their website redesign, and everyone was super happy in the end.”

The second response is short on details. It uses second person pronouns and qualifiers like “really contributed,” and “super happy.”

Skip the Struggle

At Brelsford Personnel, we have over 30 years of experience helping companies and job seekers find the perfect match. We conduct thorough background and reference checks and we spend time getting to know candidates one-on-one. Hiring strong employees doesn’t have to be a struggle. Get in touch to find out more.

Sources:
https://www.forbes.com/sites/markmurphy/2017/11/12/how-to-tell-if-a-job-candidate-is-lying-in-the-interview/#5dc06ac111e0
https://hiring.workopolis.com/article/7-telling-interview-questions/
https://www.coburgbanks.co.uk/blog/assessing-applicants/5-ways-to-tell-someone-is-lying/

Succeeding At Work Even When You Have a Difficult Boss

Succeeding At Work Even When You Have a Difficult Boss

Last year Gallup’s World Poll released staggering statistics. They surveyed employees from 160 countries and found only 15 percent of them said they felt engaged at work. Of other 85 percent, many were okay with their company or organization; they just said they don’t like their boss. If you’re in that 85 percent, maintain your focus and keep a tough boss from ruining your week with these tips.

Step Back and Evaluate

Sometimes employees get stuck in a loop of working hard hoping to gain approval, praise or promotion and receiving the opposite. They get angry, resentment grows and conflict may occur. After a while, the employee might decide to do better, work harder or put in more hours and the cycle starts over again.

If that’s you, it’s time to break the cycle. Take some time to ask yourself the following questions:

  • What motivates your boss to exhibit the behavior that causes problems? Do they have higher-ups applying the same pressure? Are there factors or requirements making them feel out of control, so they take it out on those nearby? Understanding motivation might help you be patient with them.

 

  • How do you react when you feel opposition? Do you resentfully take longer to do a task or hide until things blow over? Are there other more positive ways you could respond?

 

  • Are there pet peeves you could be extra diligent to avoid? If dress code violations set him or her off, don’t see how close to the line you can skate before you get an email rant. If deadlines make her nervous, don’t wait until the last minute to turn in your part of the project.

Dealing with a difficult boss is like many other relationships. Sometimes finding an acceptable compromise or putting in extra effort isn’t about giving in to unreasonable demands; it’s about preserving your sanity.

Communicate More Effectively

If you feel like you need more feedback or direction, ask your boss if you can schedule a meeting to help improve your job performance. Have a frank discussion about what your boss feels are your most important duties and why.

Listen for the goals behind the words. If you feel your boss is willing, explore ways to prevent future misunderstanding and frustration without placing blame.

Further improve communication by repeating back the message. For example, if your boss says, “Get me that now,” compliance might not be possible in the next 60 seconds, but don’t panic. Repeat back something like, “Sure, I will before lunchtime be okay?”

Enlist Support

Find a trustworthy person who is thriving in the workplace and learn from them. Don’t choose the group that gossips or gripes, look for someone who can listen and support from a position of positivity and understanding.

If your job is making your life miserable and nothing you do seems to help, it may be time to change positions. Watch for openings within your company and see if there’s the possibility of a transfer or start researching employment at another organization.

Brelsford Personnel places qualified candidates with top East Texas employers. Browse our online postings or get in touch today.

 

Find a Job in Tyler With These 3 Interview Tips

Find a Job in Tyler With These 3 Interview Tips

Job interviews are stressful. The more you want the position, the more pressure you’re going to feel. Practicing helps settle your nerves, identifies your areas of weakness and helps you be your best when you sit down with a potential employer. Find a job in Tyler when you follow these tips.

Enlist Help

Ask a friend or family member to act as your interviewer. Your spouse or best friend might have trouble remaining objective, so select someone else if possible. If you’re a student, your advisor or career services department might give you an unbiased view.

Set up a time for your practice interview so you can test drive your answers to common interview questions. A mock interview will help reduce your feelings of stress and anxiety and help improve your confidence.

Choose someone you can trust to be honest with you. Give them the job posting and any information you’ve gathered about the company. Let them know ahead of time you want their constructive feedback and that their contribution might be the difference between landing your dream job and making mistakes that cost you the position.

Ask them to evaluate not just what you say, but your body language. Do you make eye contact? Do you fidget? Are your answers thorough without being too long? What could you do to more clearly showcase what you’re capable of? When they give you that feedback, really listen.

Find a Job in Tyler With These 3 Interview Tips

Make It As Real As Possible

You may know exactly where your new blouse or your best blazer is hanging in your closet, but that’s not enough. You don’t want to find out your shoe has a broken buckle five minutes before you have to leave for your interview. Get dressed like you’re actually meeting with your interviewer to avoid any surprises and the stress that goes with them.

Print or gather any resources you’ll take to the actual meeting. Refer to them when you practice as you would at your real interview to re-familiarize yourself with their contents.

Start the interview like you will in real life, with a handshake and a greeting. It feels strange to begin that way with someone you already know, but the first few seconds of your real interview can be stressful. It’s easier if you’ve walked through it before.

Practice Common Questions

Some interview questions are common in any industry. Spend some time preparing to answer questions like, “What can you tell me about yourself?” and “What are your strengths and weaknesses?” Other questions are industry specific.

Create a list of common interview questions for your industry and give that list to your friend or family member. Even if they aren’t the exact questions your interviewer asks, you’ll gain experience answering similar ones.

Be specific in your answers. Employers don’t just want to hear you’re good at your job, they want to know specific situations where you’ve handled difficult personality types, overcome challenges or developed new solutions that increased profit.

For more on writing your resume, dressing for interview success and communicating effectively, see our resources page. Start looking for your next job when you check our online East Texas job listings today.

Missy Ticer is a blogger and East Texas resident who found her dream job. Content is exclusively for use by Brelsford Personnel.

Sources:

https://www.thebalance.com/job-interview-practice-how-to-rehearse-for-an-interview-2062803

https://www.themuse.com/advice/how-to-do-a-practice-interview-thatll-actually-help-you

https://www.monster.com/career-advice/article/Practice-Makes-Perfect

Obvious signs your employee is looking for a new job

Obvious signs your employee is looking for a new job

Jane McNeill

Managing Director NSW & WA at Hays

[Courtesy of linkedin.com]

Every day, many people around the world make the brave and exciting decision to leave their current employer in pursuit of a new challenge. It’s an inevitable part of the world of work. However, despite this, hiring managers are often left in a state of shock or even panic when a member of their team hands in their notice unexpectedly.

So, as a hiring manager, what can you do to pre-empt this feeling and plan accordingly? From my experience, there are a number of signs which could indicate a member of your team may be looking elsewhere. As such, I’ve outlined a few of these below.

Admittedly, whilst these signs may not mean much in isolation of one another, I would say a combination of these behaviours is a strong indicator that a member of your staff is about to jump ship, and it’s time to start preparing.

1. They’re using their personal phone more often

If your employee is frequently disappearing outside to speak on their personal phone, or they seem to be using it more often than usual during work hours, then I would class this as one of the signs that they may be speaking to a recruiter or hiring manager. However, I do urge you not to jump to conclusions here – there may be something happening in their personal lives, which requires them to use their phone more. Just keep an eye on how often this happens, especially if it is affecting how productive they are being. And, this brings me onto my next point.

2. Their performance has slipped

Sometimes when an employee can see an end in sight, they tend to clock off mentally, which will inevitably impact on their performance and productivity. This will be evident in their level of involvement during meetings, and whether they seem to be paying less attention or contributing fewer ideas than before. You should also keep an eye on the quality and output of work they are producing.

3. Their attendance has dropped

Is your employee starting to get into the habit of leaving early or turning up late? Are they requesting random days off in the middle of the week at short notice? This is a common clue that they’re going to interviews.

4. They are acting non-committal

If this member of the team won’t commit to future projects or stays quiet during conversations surrounding these, I would suggest that this is because they know they won’t be there to see them through.

5. They are turning up to work looking smarter than usual

Your employee may be arriving to work dressed more formally than usual. If this is the case, then they may well have had an interview that morning, or will have one lined up for their lunch break or after work. This is more than likely to be the case if they normally turn up looking fairly casual.

6. They are more active on LinkedIn

Have you noticed this team member updating their profile, getting involved in more conversations, connecting with more people, and even asking for recommendations on LinkedIn? If so, chances are they are using LinkedIn as part of their job searching process. It’s just a shame that they don’t know how to keep their activity hidden from your news feed.

7. They are distancing themselves

If this employee is acting more distant, whether it’s avoiding work social occasions, or simply making less conversation with colleagues, then this could be an indication that they’re starting to disengage with the team, and almost starting to prepare to leave mentally. Again, this could be put down to their personal matters, so always check that everything is ok with this individual in terms of their wellbeing before you presume that their behavior is work related.

8. They recently asked for something (and didn’t get it)

Whether it’s a pay rise, promotion or training course, this employee, for whatever reason, may have just been refused one of their requests. This may have left a bitter taste in their mouth, and prompted them to look elsewhere. If any of the above behaviors follow a situation where they asked for something and didn’t get it, then I would say it’s safe to consider that this employee may be looking to leave.

Don’t jump to conclusions

Remember that the above signs are also an indication that this employee is simply unhappy, whether it’s personal or work-related, and are not looking for another job at all. You may just need to check in with them to get the full story and find out if there is anything you can do to help. If this conversation doesn’t provide any explanation as to why this employee is acting differently, and you still believe they are looking elsewhere, start to brace yourself practically (and emotionally) for the moment that resignation letter lands on your desk.

What next?

If this employee does decide to explore pastures new, then start working with an expert recruiter on your hiring strategy, from what the job description will include, to the types of questions you will ask.

 

Laid off? See Ways to Maintain a Positive Attitude During Job Search

By: Catherine Adenle

[Courtesy of articlesbase.com]

Laid off See Ways to Maintain a Positive Attitude During Job Search

A major feature of unemployment is that it is another cross-road in your life and only you can choose which direction you take. There are very few opportunities like this in your life. Paradoxically, while you may not have chosen the redundancy or lay off situation, it has delivered the opportunity for you to now carefully choose your future direction. However, realizing this is crucial because you have to first maintain a positive mental attitude and use the same positive attitude to do a job search.

While maintaining a positive attitude is vital to a successful job search, there will be times when you get discouraged. It may seem impossible to revive that positive energy level. But there are many things you can do to bring your good outlook back to life and keep it in good shape.

Think of the following tips as a crash course in job search CPR – Cheerful, Positive, Resuscitation.

Remember to feel good about yourself.

This is a golden rule and the key to a positive attitude. Remember, all the points that follow this are ways of helping you feel good about yourself. Remember, no one else can feel good for you. Reach out to that wonderful place inside you where no one else has control over and bring it to the surface and let it radiate through your being.

Talk positively about yourself and your abilities.

Don’t talk yourself down. Be very positive about yourself, your skills and your achievements. You were not sacked, you were not made redundant, the position you were in was made redundant due to business refocus! Think about all your achievements in the past and be happy about them. Be proud of yourself and let it show in your talk, walk and the way you see life. What you call yourself is what people will call you. What you believe about yourself is the foundation of all your future actions.

Take total charge!

Only you can do it, roll up your sleeves, be ready to get your hands dirty and take charge. Be present, be visible, be accountable, stand out and be ready. Accept full responsibility for your life and your job search. It is not up to your partner, mother, father, girlfriend or boyfriend, or your aunt Tania in ‘God knows where’ to find you a job. Although it is important that you expand your circle of influence by networking like there is no tomorrow and your network will be a definite help, but YOU are responsible for the success of your job search so learn to be a superstar job seeker. If you don’t have a job, your current job is that of a Job Search Manager.

Let go of regrets about the past.

Move on, instead of blaming yourself or anybody and constantly rehashing past mistakes, take the opportunity to learn from the past. Build on past experiences to improve yourself and your abilities. Waste no time on unproductive thoughts and things. Be pragmatic and live in the present with a focus on a new beginning.

Attitude is contagious.

Surround yourself with supportive, positive people. Walk away from nay sayers, or emotional vampires. Don’t let them drain you of your positive energy.

Stop worrying about the future.

While you don’t want to live in the past, you also don’t want to live in the future. I know that worrying is a habit, get past it, you can change the habit if you really try. If you find yourself stuck in a negativity rut, shovel yourself out by focusing on your hopes and dreams rather than on your fears. Dust yourself off and put solutions in place to help you get to where you dream of.

Flatter yourself.

The job search period is no time to be humble. Make a list of every positive feedback that you ever received and why. Read every complimentary e-mail and things said about you that you can find. Letters of praise, past awards, performance appraisals, or any other positive recognitions you have are good ways to remind yourself of your worth and talents. Paste these things on a wall or a bulletin board in your work area at home to boost your spirits whenever you feel a little down.

Start each day on a positive, upbeat note.

Trust me, the start of your day will set the tempo for everything that follows. So it is important that you do something every morning that will put you in a good mood, whether that is taking a walk, walking your dog, listening to some upbeat music, twittering, blogging, running, surfing the Internet, doing a crossword, or just relaxing with a good cup of coffee or tea.

Get physical!

Don’t vegetate on a sofa with a remote in one hand and a pile of biscuits feeling sorry for yourself. You’ve heard the saying, “healthy body, healthy mind.” Keep yourself healthy and in good physical shape. This will boost your energy level and make it easier to maintain a positive mental attitude. Exercise regularly, eat a well-balanced diet, get enough sleep, chill out with positive friends and not the ones that will talk your emotions down. Turn the volume of your music up and dance but don’t disturb your neighbors!

Create a ‘job search’ schedule and stick to it.

Knowing what you are supposed to do each day can prevent you from feeling lost or bored. Sticking to your schedule as closely as possible will provide focus to your job search.

Keep up appearances

Turn your cool and professional swagger on. While nobody expects you to wear a suit and tie every day on your job search, try not to dress too casually. Keep your work space and living space neat and tidy. Set a positive framework for your job search.

Take a team approach to finding a job.

Even if the team is only two people, it is helpful to have somebody else to share ideas with and to review your progress on a regular basis. Talk to your former colleagues and share tips. Talk about what success will look like and how to get there. Go for a drink and discuss in a happy environment.

Accept your cycles.

While it is important to maintain a positive attitude, it’s unrealistic to think that you will be 100% positive forever. The trick is not to get down on yourself when you get down. Set a time limit on how long (10 minutes, for example) you will allow yourself to stay down when you feel a little depressed.

Join a professional group.

If you are looking for a job in a certain profession, join LinkedIn, Twitter and Facebook. ‘Follow’ the company, ‘friend’ them and ‘like’ their products. Comment on their recent developments and follow their news. However, be professional at all times. Joining an association can be an excellent way to keep up to date on developments and trends. It will help you develop your network and put you in contact with people that have interests similar to yours.

Keep growing.

Continue to develop your skills and knowledge while looking for work. Do this by:

  1. Taking a class.
  2. Attending free webinars
  3. Taking part in Twitter (professional) chats
  4. Attending conferences, workshops and seminars.
  5. Reading pertinent articles on the web
  6. Creating a blog of your own
  7. Subscribing to RSS feeds
  8. Subscribing to trade magazines.
  9. Reading the newspaper and other current-affair magazines.
  10. Doing volunteer work that uses the skills and knowledge you want to use in your next job. If you are not immediately successful in finding work, you might start to question your skills and qualifications. Keeping on top of the skills, knowledge and trends in your field will make you feel positive about your ability to do the type of work you want to do.

Don’t take rejections personally.

Very few people land the very first job they apply to or are interviewed for. Your attitude really depends on how you look at things. You can see a job rejection as a personal attack on your abilities or character, or you can see it as an opportunity to grow and learn more about yourself.

3 Benefits to Using a Staffing Firm in your Job Search

By Debra Auerbach
[Courtesy of Career Builder.com]

Three Benefits to Using a Staffing Firm in your Job Search

THREE KEY ADVANTAGES OF USING A STAFFING FIRM ARE EXPERIENCE, INSIGHTS AND CONFIDENTIAL OPPORTUNITIES.

Sometimes a job search can feel isolating. You’re spending hours upon hours searching for opportunities, working on your resume and applying to job openings, often without having any outside feedback about what you’re doing right or wrong. That isolation can add a lot of emotional stress to an already nerve-wracking experience.

What you may not realize is that you don’t have to go it alone. “Psychologists tell us that next to death of a spouse, death of a child and death of a parent, the fourth most emotional experience we have, coupled with divorce, is searching for a job. It is emotionally stressful,” says Tony Beshara, owner and president of Babich & Associates, the oldest placement and recruitment service in Texas. “A professional staffing firm can help eliminate that emotional stress. Staffing firms are in the trenches on a daily basis with candidates and employers.”

Beshara says the three key advantages of using a staffing firm are experience, insights and confidential opportunities. Read on to learn more about these benefits and how staffing firms can play a crucial role in helping you find your next career:

1. Experience

According to Beshara, the average U.S. professional changes jobs every two and a half to three years. So that means a worker may go a long stretch of time before needing to engage in a job search. Staffing firm recruiters, on the other hand, live and breathe the job-search process daily.

Beshara points out that within the period of time between job searches, the job market can change – sometimes drastically. “The staffing professional is current on exactly what is going on in the immediate market. They have a unique perspective that the job seeker will not have. The market for a particular skill or experience is never the same as it was three years ago. It isn’t likely any job candidate is going to be aware of that change. So, the ‘new’ candidate may think that finding a job is going to be like ‘last time,’ but it’s not.”

A knowledgeable staffing professional can help navigate a job seeker through the market changes, so the job seeker is less likely to encounter any surprises or challenges along the way. “The experienced staffing pro doesn’t give theoretical or abstract advice, but practical ‘this is the way it is … this is what you should expect … this is what we should do’ advice,” Beshara says.

2. Insights

One of the often frustrating parts about job searching is not getting any feedback from employers as to why you aren’t the right fit for a role. When working with a staffing firm, you get access to that kind of information, which can help improve your search now and down the line.

“Staffing professionals have insights that candidates can’t get anywhere else,” Beshara says. “Since the majority of us work the same clients and the same hiring mangers over many years, we know what they like and how they like it, what they will hire and what they won’t. Since we get to know them personally, we not only understand the job they are trying to fill but we know their personalities and personal likes and dislikes. We give those insights to our candidates to be sure both parties have the best chance of success not in just getting a job, but [in having] a long, solid employment relationship.”

3. Confidential opportunities

According to a 2014 study conducted by CareerBuilder and Inavero, the attribute job seekers value the most in staffing sales representatives or recruiters is that they can find opportunities job seekers wouldn’t be able to find themselves. Not only is that because staffing professionals are skilled at knowing which jobs might be the right fit, but it’s also because they are privy to opportunities that job seekers wouldn’t normally have access to.

“Because our clients trust us, they come to us with confidential job opportunities before they go to the general market,” Beshara says. “We have access to the ‘hidden’ job market. Hiring authorities will often ask us to fill positions that even people in their own organization don’t know about.”

Sometimes, there doesn’t even need to be a job opening for a staffing firm to get you a job. “Again, because of trust and insight, we know the kinds of employers that are interested in certain types of experience, whether or not they are ‘actively looking’ for a candidate,” Beshara notes. “One-third of the positions we fill don’t exist before we call a hiring authority representing a candidate we know they would be interested in speaking with. Employers will hire exceptional candidates when they come along even if they don’t have a formal opening. A good staffing professional knows his or her hiring authorities well enough to know the kind of candidate they’d be interested in even if they aren’t formally ‘looking.'”