Still No Job? 3 Tips for Keeping Your Chin Up

Still No Job 3 Tips for Keeping Your Chin Up

The longer a job search drags on, the harder it can get. Bills pile up. That voice of anxiety that was once just a whisper becomes a steady stream of chatter. While it’s tempting to curl up in a ball and have a pity party, that won’t solve the problem. Being proactive can help you stay positive.

Be A Professional Job Hunter

Uncertainty can be devastating to the mind and emotions. If you stay up late because you don’t have anywhere you have to be, you’ll sleep late and feel lethargic. If your job search is sporadic you could end up on an emotional roller coaster, swinging wildly between hope, disappointment and boredom.

Taking charge of your situation begins in the mind. Quit thinking of yourself as a person without a job. Instead, treat your daily job hunt like an actual job.

Plan your day and stick to that plan. Set an alarm and establish a routine. Get dressed in the clothes you would wear going to work. Then spend your time on tasks that will get you closer to your goal.

Research how to make your resume the best it can be. Learn how to write a cover letter that makes employers want to read your resume. Sign up for online training to improve or add skills. Until you find a job, be excellent at looking for one.

Volunteer

When you’re working full time you don’t have much free time on your hands. Use this chance to offer your skills to organizations or people who need them and can’t afford to pay for them or need volunteer help. Volunteering will help you stay positive, and it might help you find a job.

Volunteering connects you with people in your community. You sign up to make a difference and meet others who want to do the same. You’ll find yourself with stronger community ties and a larger social network, which is valuable.

Volunteering provides mental and physical benefits. Being out of work is stressful. A long, drawn-out job search creates feelings of anxiety and sometimes depression. Helping others improves your physical and psychological well-being. A Harvard Health article suggests volunteering could lower blood pressure and provide other health benefits.

Volunteering hones marketable skills. Many opportunities come with training that looks great on your resume. Volunteering will also help you keep current skills sharp while between jobs. Add community and volunteer work to your resume.

Find Help

When you’re looking for a job in the Tyler or Longview area, contact an East Texas staffing firm. At Brelsford Personnel we have decades of experience helping job seekers find the right fit and we have opportunities that aren’t posted anywhere else. We know the Tyler labor market, and for job seekers our services are free. See what jobs we currently have available or submit your resume today.

How to Attract The Best East Texas Employees Part 3 – Build a Winning Corporate Culture

How to Attract The Best East Texas Employees Part 3 – Build a Winning Corporate Culture

Is It Really That Important?

Is company culture just a buzzword, or does it make a difference in employee recruitment, performance and retention? Harvard Business Review says company culture “picks up where the employee handbook leaves off.” Entrepreneur.com defines it as “a blend of the values, beliefs, taboos, symbols, rituals and myths all companies develop over time.”

Your corporate culture is an essential part of developing your brand’s identity and values. A strong company culture attracts the best East Texas employees and keeps them engaged. It decides how staff responds when the boss is out of the room or the challenge they face takes an unexpected turn.

Corporate Culture Statistics

When savvy business owners consider investing time, energy and other resources, they seek data that indicates they’ll see a return on that investment. Here are some numbers.

  • A Columbia University study analyzed the relationship between job satisfaction and employee turnover and found employees who ranked their company culture as high left only 13.9 percent of the time. Offices with a poor company culture had a turnover rate up to 48.4 percent.

 

  • Company culture makes employees happier and more productive. One study by the Department of Economics at the University of Warwick discovered happy workers are 12 percent more productive than average, while unhappy employees are 10 percent less productive. People work harder when they’re happy.

 

  • When researchers in a Duke’s Fuqua School of Business study talked to 1,800 CEOs and CFOs, 92 percent of them said improving their firm’s culture would increase their company’s value. They linked ineffective culture with high turnover, unethical behavior and poor quarterly earnings.

4 Components of a Strong Corporate Culture

Corporate culture is about more than just pleasant lighting, free snacks and mentioning birthdays at staff meetings.

Strong corporate culture has a mission or vision. TED has a two-word mission statement that says the community’s purpose is to “spread ideas.” Coca Cola says their mission is “to refresh the world in mind, body and spirit.” Your vision or mission guides employee decision making and spills into interactions with customers, vendors and stakeholders.

Strong culture has clearly articulated values. Personal values dictate how people live their lives. Company values define how employees and stakeholders act in business and in the community. Values might include a commitment to innovation, environmental sustainability, compassion, honesty, dependability or a spirit of adventure.

Staff communicates with respect. People feel comfortable bringing up new ways of doing things. Managers offer feedback constructively and encourage each team member to be their best. There’s an open door communication policy with a clearly defined process for resolving conflict.

New hires fit. When people spend most of their day together, they are united if they share the same mission and values. Your employees bring your company culture to life.

In the book Built to Last, James Collins and Jerry Porras studied 18 companies over six years to try and identify cultural attributes of top ranking US companies. Each company had different beliefs and values, so a strong culture wasn’t tied specifically to prioritizing idealism, courage or self-improvement.

What they all had in common was that they prioritized hiring, managing and training employees based on their vision and values. They had a clear system for making sure each new hire was a cultural fit.

How to Attract The Best East Texas Employees Part 3 – Build a Winning Corporate Culture

Company Culture and Recruiting

The people you hire represent your company even when they’re not working. They talk about their job when they’re sitting on the patio at Fresh. During the day they post memes to social media that indicate how they feel about their jobs and their co-workers. When they’re at church or the gym, who they are either aligns or contrasts with what your business values.

Finding the right fit isn’t just about retention and productivity. It’s about what’s best for each candidate. When people are in an environment that suits their beliefs and values, they grow and thrive. When they’re not, they feel dissatisfied and unengaged.

Know how your values impact job duties for each role. Reference them in your job posting and design interview questions that relate directly to those values. Build them into your onboarding process. Regularly communicate them at every level of your organization.

Shaping Your Current Culture

Mold your current culture by doing the following:

  • Look at your current mission statement and identify the key values that will form the foundation of your company culture.

 

  • Interview staff to see where you stand. Inc. provides a 15-question true or false quiz to evaluate corporate culture with advantages and pitfalls for some of the most common types, or you can develop your own. If weaknesses emerge, state what you want to change and how you plan to do so.

 

  • Seek employee input on the values you’ve identified.

 

  • Communicate cultural values and goals. Put them in your handbook, in the breakroom and in the company newsletter.

 

  • Encourage everyone to drink the Kool-Aid. If management and staff worked together to find what you’re passionate about, everyone should be a believer. If you can’t practice what you preach, don’t preach it.

 

  • Prioritize ownership. Let each individual know how they contribute to the big picture.

 

  • Regularly express gratitude. Thank people in public and in private for the ways they demonstrate company values. Take time for thanksgiving during celebrations and times of conflict or stress.

Solid company culture turns individuals into teams. It attracts employees who love their jobs and keeps them engaged.

Hire a Cultural Fit Every Time

At Brelsford Personnel, our goal is to make a positive difference for the people we serve. Since 1988 we’ve successfully placed candidates with top Texas companies because we study our clients.

We seek to start each relationship with employers by making a site visit so we understand your organization’s personality, leadership style and mission. We screen candidates for both skill and personality to match employers and staff. Experience the Brelsford difference when you get in touch today.

Sources:
https://hbr.org/2013/05/six-components-of-culture
https://www.forbes.com/sites/forbescoachescouncil/2018/01/29/15-best-ways-to-build-a-company-culture-that-thrives/#47c84e0c1b96
https://blog.kissmetrics.com/great-company-culture/
https://www.entrepreneur.com/article/239475

Content by Missy for Brelsford Personnel

Find a Job in Tyler With These 3 Interview Tips

Find a Job in Tyler With These 3 Interview Tips

Job interviews are stressful. The more you want the position, the more pressure you’re going to feel. Practicing helps settle your nerves, identifies your areas of weakness and helps you be your best when you sit down with a potential employer. Find a job in Tyler when you follow these tips.

Enlist Help

Ask a friend or family member to act as your interviewer. Your spouse or best friend might have trouble remaining objective, so select someone else if possible. If you’re a student, your advisor or career services department might give you an unbiased view.

Set up a time for your practice interview so you can test drive your answers to common interview questions. A mock interview will help reduce your feelings of stress and anxiety and help improve your confidence.

Choose someone you can trust to be honest with you. Give them the job posting and any information you’ve gathered about the company. Let them know ahead of time you want their constructive feedback and that their contribution might be the difference between landing your dream job and making mistakes that cost you the position.

Ask them to evaluate not just what you say, but your body language. Do you make eye contact? Do you fidget? Are your answers thorough without being too long? What could you do to more clearly showcase what you’re capable of? When they give you that feedback, really listen.

Find a Job in Tyler With These 3 Interview Tips

Make It As Real As Possible

You may know exactly where your new blouse or your best blazer is hanging in your closet, but that’s not enough. You don’t want to find out your shoe has a broken buckle five minutes before you have to leave for your interview. Get dressed like you’re actually meeting with your interviewer to avoid any surprises and the stress that goes with them.

Print or gather any resources you’ll take to the actual meeting. Refer to them when you practice as you would at your real interview to re-familiarize yourself with their contents.

Start the interview like you will in real life, with a handshake and a greeting. It feels strange to begin that way with someone you already know, but the first few seconds of your real interview can be stressful. It’s easier if you’ve walked through it before.

Practice Common Questions

Some interview questions are common in any industry. Spend some time preparing to answer questions like, “What can you tell me about yourself?” and “What are your strengths and weaknesses?” Other questions are industry specific.

Create a list of common interview questions for your industry and give that list to your friend or family member. Even if they aren’t the exact questions your interviewer asks, you’ll gain experience answering similar ones.

Be specific in your answers. Employers don’t just want to hear you’re good at your job, they want to know specific situations where you’ve handled difficult personality types, overcome challenges or developed new solutions that increased profit.

For more on writing your resume, dressing for interview success and communicating effectively, see our resources page. Start looking for your next job when you check our online East Texas job listings today.

Missy Ticer is a blogger and East Texas resident who found her dream job. Content is exclusively for use by Brelsford Personnel.

Sources:

https://www.thebalance.com/job-interview-practice-how-to-rehearse-for-an-interview-2062803

https://www.themuse.com/advice/how-to-do-a-practice-interview-thatll-actually-help-you

https://www.monster.com/career-advice/article/Practice-Makes-Perfect

3 Benefits to Using a Staffing Firm in your Job Search

By Debra Auerbach
[Courtesy of Career Builder.com]

Three Benefits to Using a Staffing Firm in your Job Search

THREE KEY ADVANTAGES OF USING A STAFFING FIRM ARE EXPERIENCE, INSIGHTS AND CONFIDENTIAL OPPORTUNITIES.

Sometimes a job search can feel isolating. You’re spending hours upon hours searching for opportunities, working on your resume and applying to job openings, often without having any outside feedback about what you’re doing right or wrong. That isolation can add a lot of emotional stress to an already nerve-wracking experience.

What you may not realize is that you don’t have to go it alone. “Psychologists tell us that next to death of a spouse, death of a child and death of a parent, the fourth most emotional experience we have, coupled with divorce, is searching for a job. It is emotionally stressful,” says Tony Beshara, owner and president of Babich & Associates, the oldest placement and recruitment service in Texas. “A professional staffing firm can help eliminate that emotional stress. Staffing firms are in the trenches on a daily basis with candidates and employers.”

Beshara says the three key advantages of using a staffing firm are experience, insights and confidential opportunities. Read on to learn more about these benefits and how staffing firms can play a crucial role in helping you find your next career:

1. Experience

According to Beshara, the average U.S. professional changes jobs every two and a half to three years. So that means a worker may go a long stretch of time before needing to engage in a job search. Staffing firm recruiters, on the other hand, live and breathe the job-search process daily.

Beshara points out that within the period of time between job searches, the job market can change – sometimes drastically. “The staffing professional is current on exactly what is going on in the immediate market. They have a unique perspective that the job seeker will not have. The market for a particular skill or experience is never the same as it was three years ago. It isn’t likely any job candidate is going to be aware of that change. So, the ‘new’ candidate may think that finding a job is going to be like ‘last time,’ but it’s not.”

A knowledgeable staffing professional can help navigate a job seeker through the market changes, so the job seeker is less likely to encounter any surprises or challenges along the way. “The experienced staffing pro doesn’t give theoretical or abstract advice, but practical ‘this is the way it is … this is what you should expect … this is what we should do’ advice,” Beshara says.

2. Insights

One of the often frustrating parts about job searching is not getting any feedback from employers as to why you aren’t the right fit for a role. When working with a staffing firm, you get access to that kind of information, which can help improve your search now and down the line.

“Staffing professionals have insights that candidates can’t get anywhere else,” Beshara says. “Since the majority of us work the same clients and the same hiring mangers over many years, we know what they like and how they like it, what they will hire and what they won’t. Since we get to know them personally, we not only understand the job they are trying to fill but we know their personalities and personal likes and dislikes. We give those insights to our candidates to be sure both parties have the best chance of success not in just getting a job, but [in having] a long, solid employment relationship.”

3. Confidential opportunities

According to a 2014 study conducted by CareerBuilder and Inavero, the attribute job seekers value the most in staffing sales representatives or recruiters is that they can find opportunities job seekers wouldn’t be able to find themselves. Not only is that because staffing professionals are skilled at knowing which jobs might be the right fit, but it’s also because they are privy to opportunities that job seekers wouldn’t normally have access to.

“Because our clients trust us, they come to us with confidential job opportunities before they go to the general market,” Beshara says. “We have access to the ‘hidden’ job market. Hiring authorities will often ask us to fill positions that even people in their own organization don’t know about.”

Sometimes, there doesn’t even need to be a job opening for a staffing firm to get you a job. “Again, because of trust and insight, we know the kinds of employers that are interested in certain types of experience, whether or not they are ‘actively looking’ for a candidate,” Beshara notes. “One-third of the positions we fill don’t exist before we call a hiring authority representing a candidate we know they would be interested in speaking with. Employers will hire exceptional candidates when they come along even if they don’t have a formal opening. A good staffing professional knows his or her hiring authorities well enough to know the kind of candidate they’d be interested in even if they aren’t formally ‘looking.'”