How to Rock Your First Day on the Job

How to Rock Your First Day on the Job

No matter how excited you are about starting your new job, you’re probably also nervous. It’s hard being the new kid, and you want to make a good first impression on the people you’ll be working with for in the foreseeable future. Try these tips to make that first day a success.

The Night Before

Your nerves are already prickly, so use that extra energy to make the next morning go smoothly. You’ll sleep better if you know you’re prepared.

Dress code varies by workplace. Take your clothing cues from the people who sat in on your interview.

Don’t just pick out what you’ll wear, try it on. If you bought something new to make a strong first impression, make sure it looks as professional in your bedroom mirror as you remember it did in the store. Locate the belt, scarf, shoes and jewelry you intended to wear with it.

If you wear brand new shoes you take the chance you’ll be limping by lunchtime. It’s better to select a pair you know will get you through the day with a spring in your step.

Set your alarm for at least half an hour earlier than you will on most days. Aim to arrive much, much earlier than you are required to. At best you’ll be there early, enter relaxed and make a great first impression. If something goes wrong, you’ll still be on time.

When You Arrive

Take a deep breath before you walk in the door and remind yourself no one expects you to learn everyone’s name and master every procedure on the first day. Show your positive attitude and enthusiasm for your new job and the rest will follow.

Nervousness makes people hunch their shoulders, look down and avoid eye contact, none of which looks friendly. Keep your head up and shoulders back as you meet people. Make eye contact and offer a welcoming smile.

Lean in when people are speaking to show you’re actively listening. Offer a handshake when you meet people, then allow your arms to hang at your sides instead of crossing them.

When you meet people, repeat their name back to them to help yourself remember. Say something like, “It’s great to meet you Samantha, how long have you been with XYZ Company?” If their name is unusual, ask how they spell it to help etch it in your memory.

Throughout the Day

Ask questions and seek help when you need it. People understand you’re new and will likely see your questions as eagerness to do a good job. If you attend training, show up with a note taking device and use it. Stay off your cell phone and don’t use your work computer for personal use.

If people invite you to eat lunch with them or attend an after-hours activity, join them! Express appreciation for the invitation, and for other ways people help you your first day.

In the evening, if the company website includes employee photos, review names and faces. Plan as thoroughly for your second day as you did for the first and you’ll find yourself in a positive routine that brings success in all the days to come.

Sources:
https://www.themuse.com/advice/what-you-must-do-the-night-before-starting-a-new-job
https://www.salary.com/articles/first-days-on-the-job-15-ways-to-make-a-great-impression/
https://www.livecareer.com/career/advice/jobs/first-days-working

Become a Human Lie Detector During Recruiting

Become a Human Lie Detector During Recruiting

Sometimes what candidates say sounds a little fishy. Other times they omit key details that would probably influence your hiring decision. A bad hire is costly, so recruiters should know how to spot an untruth.

Find Their Baseline

An actual polygraph (lie detector) test works by measuring a person’s breathing, pulse, blood pressure and perspiration. Some also measure body movement. After the technician attaches sensors to the subject, they ask simple questions to establish what is normal for that person. Try doing a similar evaluation the next time you conduct an interview.

Start with low-stress questions like how long it took them to get to your office or how they heard about the position. Notice how they sit in their chair, how they breathe and what their eyes do when they’re comfortable. Since you’re interviewing them for a job not interrogating them for murder, candidates probably aren’t going to break a sweat when they lie, but they might show subtle changes in body language.

Signs to Watch For

There’s a myth that when people are right handed, they look to the right when they’re telling the truth and look to the left when they tell a lie. Unfortunately it’s not that simple. Each person is different. Watch for deviations from the baseline in these areas.

  • Speech – When people feel nervous their pulse speeds up and sometimes their throat gets tight. Their voice might have a higher pitch when they give an invented response. If they pause frequently or keep clearing their throat, they might be stalling while they try to think of a response.

 

  • Body language – If your candidate was calm for the first part of the interview and they suddenly start shifting in their chair, shuffling their feet or fidgeting with their hands or clothing, pay extra attention to their words. If they were animated for most of the conversation and suddenly become still, that might also signal dishonesty.

 

  • Micro-expressions – Sometimes you see a flicker of emotion that happens so quickly you question if it was ever there in the first place. Learn to trust your gut. If you asked a question and saw a split second of panic, fear, concern or irritation, listen very closely to what comes next.

Keep in mind that it’s natural to be nervous during an interview. When you suspect an untruth, ask more questions until you feel you’ve either given the candidate a chance to talk through their anxiety or give more evidence they’re being dishonest.

Listen to that inner voice that says there might be something going on. Make a note to fact check before you make a final decision.

Grammar Giveaways

Honest responses tend to use first person pronouns and be rich in details. When someone is lying, they have to invent their response on the fly. The answer might be vague and use second or third person pronouns as they unconsciously distance themselves from their lie. They also might add qualifiers to make the story seem more impressive than it is. Compare these two responses:

“I once worked for a group of real estate professionals who wanted to improve their online presence. Their mobile load speed was slow, they had old information on their website, data just wasn’t arranged logically. They wanted to be involved in the improvement process. So I sat down with their team. They have this conference room with huge windows and we used those as a work surface. We put all their site elements on post-it notes and used that to make a sitemap.”

That response has first person pronouns and details like the post-it notes that indicate it’s a genuine memory. A dishonest response might be more like this:

“There were these helpful people at a company who really contributed to what was done. They had a lot of ideas for their website redesign, and everyone was super happy in the end.”

The second response is short on details. It uses second person pronouns and qualifiers like “really contributed,” and “super happy.”

Skip the Struggle

At Brelsford Personnel, we have over 30 years of experience helping companies and job seekers find the perfect match. We conduct thorough background and reference checks and we spend time getting to know candidates one-on-one. Hiring strong employees doesn’t have to be a struggle. Get in touch to find out more.

Sources:
https://www.forbes.com/sites/markmurphy/2017/11/12/how-to-tell-if-a-job-candidate-is-lying-in-the-interview/#5dc06ac111e0
https://hiring.workopolis.com/article/7-telling-interview-questions/
https://www.coburgbanks.co.uk/blog/assessing-applicants/5-ways-to-tell-someone-is-lying/

Why Someone Else Got the East Texas Job You Wanted

Why Someone Else Got the East Texas Job You Wanted

You thought it was a sure thing. You had all the qualifications and felt like your background and experience made you a perfect fit. You felt a connection with the interviewer. They may even have indicated you could expect to hear good things soon.

That’s why you felt stunned and confused when you heard they gave the job, your job, to someone else. Everyone’s situation is different, but if it happened to you, identifying what went wrong might lead to a better result next time.

The Other Candidate Was an Exact Match

The person interviewing you might have genuinely felt you would probably be their next hire. You already had most of the skills they were looking for and your personality seemed like it would fit well with their existing team.

Then the next person they interviewed seemed like they were tailor-made for the position. You were a good fit, but they were perfect.

They Hired the Most Prepared Interviewee

Think back through your interview. Did some of the questions catch you off guard? Employers hire candidates who have done their research and ask questions like the following:

  • What do you most value about our company’s mission?
  • What about the job description caught your eye?
  • What can you bring to our company?

The candidate they hired may have spent time before the interview in intense study. If they researched the company and had a firm grasp of how their background and skills related to the job description and you didn’t, you may have been outshined.

Employers are looking for specifics. Before your next interview, be sure you can articulate what you bring to the table. Pay special attention to the job description. Think of several specific examples where you have displayed the job characteristics they’re looking for.

The Other Candidate Had These Characteristics

CareerBuilder interviewed 2,076 hiring managers and human resource professionals in a number of industries. They asked if they were evaluating two candidates and both had the same skills, educational background and work history, how they would decide who to pick. Here are the top three most influential characteristics:

  • 27 percent of hiring managers said they would pick the candidate with a better sense of humor.
  • 26 percent showed preference for people who are involved in the community.
  • 22 percent of interviewers said they would choose the candidate who was better dressed.

If you’ve been passed over for a position, next time show how you have those characteristics. Interviews are stressful, but don’t be afraid to laugh at yourself and show your good nature.

When questions involve your hobbies and interests, mention how you work with your son’s little league team and volunteer unloading cars at the elementary school. Dress for success with the guidelines on our resources page.

Find a Job in East Texas

At Brelsford Personnel, we help East Texans reach their career goals. Submit your resume to us and become one of our registered candidates today.

Sources:
https://www.careerbuilder.com/share/aboutus/pressreleasesdetail.aspx?sd=8%2F28%2F2013&id=pr778&ed=12%2F31%2F2013
https://www.warnersearchgroup.com/news/20-reasons-someone-else-got-the-job-instead-of-you-26503

Looking for Work? Find Out How Low Unemployment Numbers Affect Your Search

Looking for Work? Find Out How Low Unemployment Numbers Affect Your Search

If you’re thinking about finding a new job, now might be the best time to do it. The national July jobs report showed employers added fewer net jobs last month than economists forecast, but unemployment still dipped near an 18-year low.

That means there aren’t as many people looking for jobs, so employers with openings have a reduced number of candidates to choose from and you have less competition for the position you want. Learn how that might affect your job hunt.

Referrals Matter More Than Ever

When unemployment is low, employers need to make every hire count and retain current staff. Recruiting software manufacturer iCIMS wanted to know factors contributing to a good hire, so they conducted surveys and studied data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Their resulting Modern Job Seeker Report found employees who were hired because of a referral were more likely to stay put.

Employers often ask their current employees if they know someone who would be a good fit. They’re more likely to hire based on a referral than on a resume submission because those hires tend to align with current culture and don’t move around.

In the iCIMS report, 70 percent of the employees surveyed were still in the role for which they were hired. If you know someone already employed where you want to work, ask for their help in getting the job.

Higher Wages, More Perks

In July of 2018, wages were at an all-time high with an average of 22.65/hour. A tight labor market and strong demand for goods and services means employers are willing to pay more for top talent.

Employers aren’t just using increased pay to sell themselves to candidates; they’re emphasizing company culture with perks like flexible scheduling and competitive benefits.

Expect Additional Scrutiny

Employers want to fill vacancies quickly, but when the applicant pool is small and getting smaller, they aren’t just looking for bodies. They may ask you to attend more than one interview to make sure you’re the best fit. The whole team might want to evaluate your skills and qualifications before making a final decision.

Industries Adding Most Jobs

Not all industries are hiring at the same rate. When you’re applying for a high-demand position, you have an advantage, but it might be harder to find work in sectors that show signs of a struggle.

According to last month’s report sporting goods, hobby, book and music retailers are losing jobs. Two sectors showing growth are construction and manufacturing.

Even though the housing market has shown a decline in the last three quarters, employers in the construction sector added 19,000 jobs last month across the nation. Manufacturing added 37,000 jobs. Healthcare employment, professional and business services and food services are also up.

Find a Job in East Texas

What East Texas job are you looking for? Brelsford Personnel has employers seeking administrative assistants, customer service representatives, accountants and more. Search our online job postings today.

Sources:
https://www.businessinsider.com/us-housing-slowdown-economy-2018-7
https://www.icims.com/sites/www.icims.com/files/public/hei_assets/Modern-Job-Seeker-Report%20Final.pdf
https://www.nytimes.com/2018/05/04/business/economy/jobs-report.html
https://www.businessinsider.com/us-jobs-report-july-2018-2018-8
https://money.usnews.com/money/blogs/outside-voices-careers/articles/2018-07-20/how-a-low-unemployment-rate-may-affect-your-job-search

Succeeding At Work Even When You Have a Difficult Boss

Succeeding At Work Even When You Have a Difficult Boss

Last year Gallup’s World Poll released staggering statistics. They surveyed employees from 160 countries and found only 15 percent of them said they felt engaged at work. Of other 85 percent, many were okay with their company or organization; they just said they don’t like their boss. If you’re in that 85 percent, maintain your focus and keep a tough boss from ruining your week with these tips.

Step Back and Evaluate

Sometimes employees get stuck in a loop of working hard hoping to gain approval, praise or promotion and receiving the opposite. They get angry, resentment grows and conflict may occur. After a while, the employee might decide to do better, work harder or put in more hours and the cycle starts over again.

If that’s you, it’s time to break the cycle. Take some time to ask yourself the following questions:

  • What motivates your boss to exhibit the behavior that causes problems? Do they have higher-ups applying the same pressure? Are there factors or requirements making them feel out of control, so they take it out on those nearby? Understanding motivation might help you be patient with them.

 

  • How do you react when you feel opposition? Do you resentfully take longer to do a task or hide until things blow over? Are there other more positive ways you could respond?

 

  • Are there pet peeves you could be extra diligent to avoid? If dress code violations set him or her off, don’t see how close to the line you can skate before you get an email rant. If deadlines make her nervous, don’t wait until the last minute to turn in your part of the project.

Dealing with a difficult boss is like many other relationships. Sometimes finding an acceptable compromise or putting in extra effort isn’t about giving in to unreasonable demands; it’s about preserving your sanity.

Communicate More Effectively

If you feel like you need more feedback or direction, ask your boss if you can schedule a meeting to help improve your job performance. Have a frank discussion about what your boss feels are your most important duties and why.

Listen for the goals behind the words. If you feel your boss is willing, explore ways to prevent future misunderstanding and frustration without placing blame.

Further improve communication by repeating back the message. For example, if your boss says, “Get me that now,” compliance might not be possible in the next 60 seconds, but don’t panic. Repeat back something like, “Sure, I will before lunchtime be okay?”

Enlist Support

Find a trustworthy person who is thriving in the workplace and learn from them. Don’t choose the group that gossips or gripes, look for someone who can listen and support from a position of positivity and understanding.

If your job is making your life miserable and nothing you do seems to help, it may be time to change positions. Watch for openings within your company and see if there’s the possibility of a transfer or start researching employment at another organization.

Brelsford Personnel places qualified candidates with top East Texas employers. Browse our online postings or get in touch today.

 

3 Must-Haves for the Ultimate Cover Letter

3 Must-Haves for the Ultimate Cover Letter

Job seekers put a lot of work into the job hunt and resume preparation. Without a great cover letter, employers might not even look at your resume. At Brelsford Personnel we’ve seen thousands of cover letters, so we have a pretty good handle on what gets results. Read on to discover how to catch that potential employer’s attention, highlight your qualifications and land the interview.

Three Brief Paragraphs

A good cover letter is no longer than three short paragraphs. Hiring managers and staffing agencies are busy. You put your education, work history and volunteer experience in your resume, so you don’t need to list it all again in your cover letter.

Use what you know about the employer and the job description to choose which of your skills to highlight. While you want to let potential employers know your capabilities, at this point you might not have enough information to state you’re the perfect fit. Stick to a short summary of what you know you can do.

These Cover Letter Sections

At the top of your cover letter, put your contact details. Include your name, street address, phone number and email address. If your LinkedIn profile is complete and updated, you can include that as well.

Beneath your contact information, create a section with the date, hiring manager’s name, the company address and phone number and the contact person’s email. If at all possible, address your letter to a person and not the generic “To Whom it May Concern” or “Sir or Madam.”

Grab attention with a first paragraph that tells how you heard about the job, why you’re interested and what professional experience you can contribute. Use the second paragraph to provide specifics on how your skills fit the job description. For example, if the job description states the employer wants an administrative assistant with technology and communication skills, succinctly explain how you used tools like Microsoft Office Suite, WordPress and Outlook to effectively communicate in a previous role.

Use your third paragraph to thank the potential employer for considering you and to request an interview. Wrap it up with “Sincerely” or “Respectfully,” then your name.

Extra Information If You’re Relocating

If your job change coincides with a move to East Texas, mention why in your cover letter. Employers are edgy about hiring someone who might not stick around, so if you have family ties, you’ve already bought a home or you have other strong reasons to want employment in the area, let them know. Tell when you anticipate moving and when you’re available for interviews.

More Job Search Resources

Find advice for writing your resume, dressing for interview success and acing the interview on our resources page. Then check out our online job postings today.

Sources:

https://writing.wisc.edu/Handbook/CoverLetters.html
https://resumecompanion.com/how-to-write-a-cover-letter/
http://money.cnn.com/2017/11/16/pf/how-to-write-cover-letter/index.html

Power Through Your Day With 5 Productivity Tips

Power Through Your Day With 5 Productivity Tips

Do you go to bed at night feeling like you’re wiped out, but you didn’t accomplish everything you needed to? That might be because work days are long and life is stressful, but sometimes a few changes can make all the difference. Try these 5 small changes that make a big difference.

Work in Chunks

It feels like you need to multi-task to get everything done, but that’s like slicing your focus into ineffective slivers. The American Psychological Association found shifting frequently between tasks cuts productivity by as much as 40 percent.

Think about how many times during the day you click over to email or pick up your cell phone because you hear it vibrate. It seems like only a few seconds, but in the course of the day it adds up.

What tasks are you behind on? Where could you stand to be as much as 40 percent more productive? Set aside chunks of time during which you give them your undivided focus.

Don’t just silence your cell and throw it in a drawer, turn it completely off or the vibration will pique your curiosity until you can’t resist checking. Sign out of your email and close the tab so you don’t receive notifications of every incoming message. Whether your chunks are 15 minutes or an hour, you’ll complete more work in that time frame than you would if you were multi-tasking.

Set a Two Minute Timer

Use this strategy to knock out tasks you find yourself dreading or putting off. When you arrive at work, before you leave for lunch or at the end of the day, set a timer. Do it at the same time every day.

Then for two minutes, sprint through your filing, pay those invoices or respond to one or two of the emails you’ve been putting off. When the timer sounds, you’re through with the unpleasant task until the next day.

Use Technology for Good

Turn your morning commute into a productivity booster by using voice-to-text technology to compile your to-do list for the day. Get a jump on meetings by turning them into teleconferences if others are available.

The online tool Rescue Time monitors how you work and lets you know how much time you spend on email, in meetings and browsing online. Rescue Time Lite is available for free and can provide insight into how you currently work.

Beat the Afternoon Slump

In countries like Spain, Greece and Italy, many employees go home for an afternoon rest. If your employer doesn’t offer a siesta after lunch, that can be a tough time of day. Instead of reaching for a coffee or energy drink, get your blood pumping to invigorate your brain with fresh oxygen.

It’s the last thing you’ll want to do when you start to feel sleepy, but leave your desk. Jog up and down the stairs a few times. If you need to communicate regularly with a co-worker, agree to have that meeting on your feet as you walk around the building or circle the parking lot. Health and fitness blog Greatist provides an extensive article on ways to get moving at work if you need more ideas.

Find a Job You Love

The best way to stay productive and focused every day is to work at a job you enjoy. Let’s sit down and talk about your career objectives when you get in touch today.

Sources:
https://www.inc.com/john-rampton/15-ways-to-increase-productivity-at-work.html
https://www.developgoodhabits.com/how-to-be-productive-work/
https://www.lifehack.org/articles/productivity/more-productive-4-ways-that-really-work.html

East Texas Jobs for College Students

East Texas Jobs for College Students

If you’re enrolled at Tyler Junior College (TJC) or the University of Texas at Tyler (UT Tyler), you don’t have much summer left. Before long you’ll be back in the classroom focused on homework and exams. Most college students also have bills to pay and need to work a part or full-time job. We’ve made a list of some of the best East Texas jobs for college students.

Jobs on Campus

Both TJC and UT Tyler offer employment for students, with some positions available in individual areas of study. The biggest difference between student assistant jobs and work-study jobs is where the funding comes from.

On-campus positions provide hands-on experience that’s great for references when you’re applying for your first job after graduation. You receive a regular paycheck even for work-study jobs and can apply those funds to your tuition or other expenses.

At UT Tyler students can work up to 19.5 hours a week and are paid twice a month. Student employees at TJC can work up to 18 hours a week. You might work in the campus library, get hired by your major’s departmental office or even work at the college fitness center.

Off-Campus Jobs for College Students

College kids in Tyler and Longview typically apply for restaurant and retail positions to make the cash they need to get through school. There’s a growing need for East Texas retail workers at places like The Village at Cumberland Park. Restaurant jobs usually let students attend morning classes, study in the afternoon and work in the evening when eateries experience peak traffic and tips are most likely to be high.

Area Starbucks locations are almost always looking for baristas, and they pay between $7.84 and $8.68/hour. The Starbucks College Achievement Program offers qualified employees assistance in paying for college.

Schedules change every semester, so flexibility is helpful when you’re working on your degree. If you have a reliable car and you don’t mind putting on the miles, Uber advertises you can make your own schedule and work as a driver. If you’re willing to work late nights and weekends you can bank some cash, then cut back on hours when you have to study for finals.

During the summer, East Texas students pick up extra money working as counselors in places like Rose City Summer Camp. The program pays $1,350 for the second half of summer, which is just starting. If you’re working toward a career in education, some of the Tyler and Longview elementary student learning centers hire tutors for summer positions.

Find a Job in East Texas That’s Right for You

Brelsford Personnel is looking for qualified Office Assistants, Bank Tellers and more. Browse our online positions or email employ@brelsfordpersonnel.com .

Sources:
https://www.kiplinger.com/slideshow/college/T014-S001-10-great-part-time-jobs-for-college-students/index.html
https://www.uttyler.edu/careersuccess/studentemployment/index.php
https://fairygodboss.com/articles/high-paying-jobs-for-college-students

 

Your Ultimate Guide to Attracting the Best East Texas Employees

This article was originally posted as a four-part series. We’ve combined all four posts so East Texas employers can find them all in one place.

Your Ultimate Guide to Attracting the Best East Texas Employees

1. Attract the Best When You Identify Key Characteristics

What happens when you combine low unemployment with retiring baby boomers and technology that allows East Texans access to jobs all over the globe? The challenge to attract top talent becomes intense.

Gallup meta-analysis suggests companies that choose the top 20 percent of candidates when it comes to talent have increased productivity, sales and profitability. They also have a significant decrease in turnover and absences. The productivity gap is huge, and it widens as job complexity increases.

That makes sense, but employers wonder how to secure that top 20 percent. The first step isn’t creating a job posting; it’s looking at the characteristics of your current top performers.

Key Traits of Top Performers

As soon as you read “top performers,” names probably came to mind. You already know the people at your company who unerringly accomplish more than anyone else. They seem to always make the right decisions, never require hand-holding and encourage others to do the same.

Every position requires a different skill set, and when you’re hiring there are non-negotiable qualifications, certifications and degrees for each. That’s what your employees do.

What we’re talking about here is what your top performers are. When you look at the people whose names popped into your head, you will probably find they share these characteristics:

  • They’re consistent. Top performers consider quality their chief priority every time. They don’t quit because the clock says they can leave. For each task, they seem to have a timeline in their heads for what must be accomplished to deliver superior results, and they always deliver. You can depend on their character as much as their competence.

 

  • They thrive when challenged. They are willing to take on the toughest assignments because they feel like they can make a difference. They don’t wait for opportunities, they create them. They have the ability to see the big picture for each project, zoom in to understand and solve for every detail, then reframe to evaluate progress.

 

  • They rely on facts and data, not emotion. They are always looking to expand their knowledge base. They research for work, but they are constantly learning in other areas of their lives as well. While they listen to their instincts in decision making, they also ask probing questions, look at industry best practices and analyze data.

 

  • They are comfortable with both teamwork and leadership. They have a confident, positive attitude that makes them an asset to any team. Other team members tend to look to them for advice and encouragement. They are comfortable giving and getting feedback. They don’t get defensive when receiving criticism because they see their weaknesses as areas for improvement. They praise others for a job well done and see success as a group effort.

 

  • They feel company goals align with their personal goals. They recognize that as they help their organization succeed, they’ll have more opportunities for advancement and professional growth. They feel they have a personal stake in helping meet organizational goals that creates a relentless drive.

Your Ultimate Guide to Attracting the Best East Texas Employees

What Top Performers Want from You

Right now you’re probably thinking, “That sounds accurate of my top employees, but people like them are hard to find.” Hiring managers often express frustration saying when they interviewed job candidates, the applicant seemed great, but once hired he or she didn’t perform as expected.

Some performance predictors are role-specific. The characteristics that make a good loan officer don’t necessarily make a good insurance adjuster.

However, just like high quality candidates share a set of characteristics, there are ways they respond to interview questions that indicates their mindset across a range of roles.

  • Excellent candidates are attracted to companies with similar beliefs and values. They are well qualified for the role, and they say they want the job because it fits what matters to them and what they are best at. In contrast, lower quality candidates say they want the job because it offers the pay, hours or benefits they’re looking for. These things matter to top candidates, but they’re not what excites them most about the position.

 

  • Top performers want challenge and opportunity. When you ask potential employees what they enjoy most about their work, they talk about being able to make a difference in peoples’ lives or solve challenges no one else could. Interviewees who aren’t as likely to be top performers might say they enjoyed positive interaction with their co-workers, appreciated their schedule or felt supported by management. Again, top performers appreciate those things, but they thrive when they have a mission.

 

  • The best candidates want growth. When you ask what their dream job looks like, they mention the importance of ongoing professional development or opportunities for advancement. Less qualified candidates think more in terms of high income, reduced stress or a position of authority.

 

  • Top candidates apply at top companies. They do their research. That doesn’t mean they only apply to large corporations. They’re also interested in small business that shows innovative thinking and strong brand values. When interviewed, they are able to tell what company strengths make them feel it would be a great place to work.

Where Can You Find Top East Texas Employees?

At Brelsford Personnel, we recognize the process of recruiting, interviewing and hiring top performers is time consuming and expensive. A bad hire is even worse. We evaluate each resume and conduct one-on-one interviews to find the best fit for each position no matter how long that takes. We have many years of experience that allows us to spot those top performers and place them in roles where they thrive. Get in touch to find out more about our process and access the best East Texas job candidates today.

2. Attract the Best By Developing Your Employee Value Proposition

Your Ultimate Guide to Attracting the Best East Texas Employees

Why would a highly talented person choose to work for your company? Ed Michaels asked the question in his 2001 book The War for Talent, and the question is still relevant today. The labor market is tight, so it’s hard to find the best East Texas employees and just as hard to keep them.

Your customers have lots of choices. So do the people who apply at your company. You invest in developing your brand image and personality for consumers. Creating your Employee Value Proposition (EVP) is similar to that process, but it’s aimed at employees instead of customers.

Do You Need an EVP?

As the name implies, an Employee Value Proposition states the value employees receive when they work for you. When some of us were just starting out, a steady paycheck was compensation enough, but hiring has changed.

The best East Texas employees are in high demand, and they’re choosy about where they work. A strong EVP provides these benefits:

It sets you apart from your competitors. Just like branding clarifies how you are unique, your EVP makes it apparent how working for your organization is different from working for other companies in the same industry. If there’s not something that makes you stand out, all employees have for comparison are job responsibilities and salary. If you don’t pay more and your competitor does, there’s no incentive to choose your company. A strong EVP clearly communicates what else you offer.

An EVP improves retention rates. When you articulate brand values and goals, you attract candidates who support them. Those employees are more likely to be engaged and motivated and less likely to look elsewhere for employment.

The employees you hire strengthen your brand. When they care about the things that matter to your business and embody key organizational traits, they exhibit brand values at every point of consumer contact.

Your Ultimate Guide to Attracting the Best East Texas Employees

Creating Your EVP

Decision-makers start by asking why the employees they’re looking for would want to apply, what would help them do their best, and what the company offers that motivates them to stay. Find answers by following these steps.

Step 1 – Identify Objectives

Decide what you want to accomplish through your EVP. Some of the most common reasons companies take the time to develop one is to attract and hire the right candidates, to improve engagement among current employees and reward top performers, to reinvigorate disengaged teams or to accomplish more with longer tenures and fewer hires.

Step 2 – Gather Information

Review employee engagement data, retention metrics and any other statistics you already have. Your best insight will come from talking to current and former employees. They’re the people who understand the best and worst aspects of working for your company. Create surveys, focus groups and exit interviews that ask questions like the following:

  • Why did you first apply to work here? Were your job expectations met? Please elaborate.

 

  • What tangible benefits we offer are most valuable in keeping you here?

 

  • What intangible benefits mean the most?

 

  • How would you describe working here to someone who was thinking about submitting their resume?

 

  • For former employees, why did you choose to leave?

Identify your most productive employees and seek to understand what attracts them and why they stay. Use those benefits as part of your workforce planning strategy so your EVP attracts more of the same type of individual.

Prospective employees can offer an outside viewpoint into how your company is perceived to job seekers. Ask what their awareness is of your company’s culture, benefits, growth opportunities and job satisfaction and how they came to that awareness.

Step 3 – Analyze Results

Sift through the data to look for patterns. Are there benefits you offer that don’t seem to matter as much as you thought they would? Are some perks more important than others? In what areas does your company receive negative feedback? Identify ways you can provide benefits that delight employees and differentiate you from rivals.

Step 4 – Draft Your EVP

Take that research and create a simple statement that outlines your brand’s commitment to employees and what they will experience. It should be inspirational while offering a realistic view of what it’s like to work for your organization.

Spell out how your company is making a difference in your industry. Align it with your principles and culture. Then test your EVP with employee focus groups to see how it resonates.

Step 5 – Promote Your EVP

Once it’s created and tested, communicate your EVP through company emails, post it on your website, integrate it into job postings and hang it where employees can see it. Discuss it with new employees during onboarding and review it when people are promoted.

Step 6 – Regularly Reevaluate

Set a timeline for assessing the extent to which your EVP is making a difference in hiring and retention. Go back to your original objectives and see how well you’re doing.

Compare data like employee turnover rates and absenteeism after you implement your EVP to what it was before you had one. Continue to collect feedback from employees about their job satisfaction, what incentives matter most and whether they feel part of a diverse, high-performance culture.

Always Hire the Best

Brelsford Personnel successfully provides high performance employees to businesses in metro Tyler and Longview because we don’t just think in terms of filling a vacancy. We get to know each of the organizations we’re privileged to work with.

When we search our candidate database and prepare a job posting, we look at more than just qualifications, skills and educational experience. Our goal is to provide employees who are a good fit for the company culture and make sure our candidates are in a role that suits them best.

Instead of worrying about finding the best employees or dealing with the consequences of a bad hire, put our expertise to work. Find out more when you get in touch today.

3. Hire Strong Employees When You Build a Strong Corporate Culture

Your Ultimate Guide to Attracting the Best East Texas Employees

Is company culture just a buzzword, or does it make a difference in employee recruitment, performance and retention? Harvard Business Review says company culture “picks up where the employee handbook leaves off.” Entrepreneur.com defines it as “a blend of the values, beliefs, taboos, symbols, rituals and myths all companies develop over time.”

Your corporate culture is an essential part of developing your brand’s identity and values. A strong company culture attracts the best East Texas employees and keeps them engaged. It decides how staff responds when the boss is out of the room or the challenge they face takes an unexpected turn.

Corporate Culture Studies

When savvy business owners consider investing time, energy and other resources, they seek data that indicates they’ll see a return on that investment. Here are some numbers.

  • A Columbia University study analyzed the relationship between job satisfaction and employee turnover and found employees who ranked their company culture as high left only 13.9 percent of the time. Offices with a poor company culture had a turnover rate up to 48.4 percent.

 

  • Company culture makes employees happier and more productive. One study by the Department of Economics at the University of Warwick discovered happy workers are 12 percent more productive than average, while unhappy employees are 10 percent less productive. People work harder when they’re happy.

 

  • When researchers in a Duke’s Fuqua School of Business study talked to 1,800 CEOs and CFOs, 92 percent of them said improving their firm’s culture would increase their company’s value. They linked ineffective culture with high turnover, unethical behavior and poor quarterly earnings.

What Makes a Strong Corporate Culture?

Corporate culture is about more than just pleasant lighting, free snacks and mentioning birthdays at staff meetings.

Strong corporate culture has a mission or vision. TED has a two-word mission statement that says the community’s purpose is to “spread ideas.” Coca Cola says their mission is “to refresh the world in mind, body and spirit.” Your vision or mission guides employee decision making and spills into interactions with customers, vendors and stakeholders.

Strong culture has clearly articulated values. Personal values dictate how people live their lives. Company values define how employees and stakeholders act in business and in the community. Values might include a commitment to innovation, environmental sustainability, compassion, honesty, dependability or a spirit of adventure.

Staff communicates with respect. People feel comfortable bringing up new ways of doing things. Managers offer feedback constructively and encourage each team member to be their best. There’s an open door communication policy with a clearly defined process for resolving conflict.

New hires fit. When people spend most of their day together, they are united if they share the same mission and values. Your employees bring your company culture to life.

In the book Built to Last, James Collins and Jerry Porras studied 18 companies over six years to try and identify cultural attributes of top ranking US companies. Each company had different beliefs and values, so a strong culture wasn’t tied specifically to prioritizing idealism, courage or self-improvement.

What they all had in common was that they prioritized hiring, managing and training employees based on their vision and values. They had a clear system for making sure each new hire was a cultural fit.

Company Culture and Hiring

The people you hire represent your company even when they’re not working. They talk about their job when they’re sitting on the patio at Fresh. During the day they post memes to social media that indicate how they feel about their jobs and their co-workers. When they’re at church or the gym, who they are either aligns or contrasts with what your business values.

Finding the right fit isn’t just about retention and productivity. It’s about what’s best for each candidate. When people are in an environment that suits their beliefs and values, they grow and thrive. When they’re not, they feel dissatisfied and unengaged.

Know how your values impact job duties for each role. Reference them in your job posting and design interview questions that relate directly to those values. Build them into your onboarding process. Regularly communicate them at every level of your organization.

Molding Your Corporate Culture

Shape your current culture by doing the following:

  • Look at your current mission statement and identify the key values that will form the foundation of your company culture.
  • Interview staff to see where you stand. Inc. provides a 15-question true or false quiz to evaluate corporate culture with advantages and pitfalls for some of the most common types, or you can develop your own. If weaknesses emerge, state what you want to change and how you plan to do so.
  • Seek employee input on the values you’ve identified.
  • Communicate cultural values and goals. Put them in your handbook, in the breakroom and in the company newsletter.
  • Encourage everyone to drink the Kool-Aid. If management and staff worked together to find what you’re passionate about, everyone should be a believer. If you can’t practice what you preach, don’t preach it.
  • Prioritize ownership. Let each individual know how they contribute to the big picture.
  • Regularly express gratitude. Thank people in public and in private for the ways they demonstrate company values. Take time for thanksgiving during celebrations and times of conflict or stress.

Solid company culture turns individuals into teams. It attracts employees who love their jobs and keeps them engaged.

Hire a Cultural Fit Every Time

At Brelsford Personnel, our goal is to make a positive difference for the people we serve. Since 1988 we’ve successfully placed candidates with top Texas companies because we study our clients.

We seek to start each relationship with employers by making a site visit so we understand your organization’s personality, leadership style and mission. We screen candidates for both skill and personality to match employers and staff. Experience the Brelsford difference when you get in touch today.

4. Hire the Best East Texas Employees by Attracting Top Millennial Talent

Your Ultimate Guide to Attracting the Best East Texas Employees

There’s always a difference between the mindset and work habits of different generations. At many companies, Baby Boomers are in leadership roles and seeking to attract, hire and manage millennials, a population segment with vastly different work habits and expectations. Attracting top millennial professionals starts with understanding what motivates them.

Millennial Statistics

A person who became a young adult during the 21st century is a Millennial. Most researchers say this group was born between the early 1980s and the early 2000s, with some demographers arguing for a little earlier or later. The oldest Millennials are in their late 30s, while the youngest are still teenagers.

Pew Research found Millennials became the largest generation in America’s workforce in 2016. Last year there were 56 million of them looking for a job or actively employed. By 2020, they will make up half the country’s workforce and 75 percent in 2025.

What Millennials are Looking For

Attract top Millennial talent by first understanding what they want. Deloitte questioned more than 10,000 individuals in 32 countries to generate their seventh annual report on Millennial business motivation, ethics, workplace optimism and concerns.

They found diversity and flexibility are the key to attracting loyal millennials.

While Millennials recognize profits are necessary, they don’t think that should be an organization’s main goal. They feel corporations should put a premium on the following:

  • Changing society for the good
  • Protecting the environment
  • Creating jobs that improve people’s lives
  • Stimulating both diversity and inclusion at work
  • Encouraging innovation

Millennials want to work where they can grow and have a future. Ninety-one percent of them say they want rapid career progression. They expect employers to have clear policies on how to earn bonuses, raises and promotions.

In the Deloitte study, two-thirds of Millennials say they will probably have left their current employer by 2020. Many of them cite poor leadership development as their reason for leaving.

Millennials grew up with technology, and they want to use it at work. They embrace Industry 4.0, which uses big data, powerful analytics, automation and the Internet of Things.

They also want training. Only 36 percent say they feel their organization is helping them prepare for technology of the future. They also want help developing soft skills like confidence, critical thinking and creativity.

Offer Millennials These Benefits

Employers compete for highly qualified candidates in every age group. Attract Millennials when you offer these benefits.

  • Career development – Provide training programs and team building opportunities. Offer skill-specific training, but also provide opportunities to develop interpersonal skills, critical thinking, creativity and responsible online behavior.

 

  • Positive social interaction – Younger employees want to interact. Encourage a monthly brown bag lunch to mix departments and management levels. Volunteer together, have a summer cook-off or send teams to one of the area’s escape rooms. Put Millennials in charge of planning.

 

  • Flexible scheduling – Instead of sick or vacation time, offer flex time employees can use as needed. You can still require employees to work traditional hours and request schedule changes, but provide them with a set number of hours to “spend” as they please. Other flexible scheduling options include a compressed work week, split shifts or scheduling that allows employees to complete work on nights and weekends.

 

  • Emotional and physical health support – Show employees you care with subsidized gym memberships, group participation in East Texas cycling and running events and free mental health support.

Retain Top Millennial Talent

Going back to the Deloitte study, two thirds of all Millennials say they’ll probably quit their current job by 2020 and one in four says they plan to quit this year. Mentally tally how many people work for you who are younger than 40. What if a quarter of them quit?

You lose everything you invested in recruiting, onboarding and training them. You have to start over, and it will take time before their replacement finds their stride within your organization.

Millennials Quit for Better Offers

A Forbes article says often Millennials leave even when they like their job because they were offered a better opportunity. Keep that from happening by giving them opportunities to grow and advance within your company. Spell out what it takes to get a raise so they know when they can expect increased pay.

People Relocate

People of every generation relocate when their spouse has a job change or a family member needs long-term care. If it’s mutually beneficial, offer telecommuting to keep employees who transfer to another area.

Millennials Go Back to School

Sometimes members of this group feel dissatisfied with their current career path and think they can’t advance without more formal education. Consider offering scholarships for employees who want schooling to advance their careers, but also provide training and opportunity inside the workplace.

Brelsford Has an Extensive Candidate Database

Brelsford Personnel provides East Texas employers with professional, top-performing employees. We’ll find the right fit for your job vacancy, and we tailor our services to fit both your needs and budget. Get in touch to hire the best East Texas employees every time.

Blog posting from Content by Missy exclusively for Brelsford Personnel

East Texas BBB Warns of Summer Job Scams

East Texas BBB Warns of Summer Job Scams

Protect Yourself From Scammers

If you’re trying to find a job in East Texas, it might be because you’re unhappy in your current position or you need more money. Unfortunately, scammers use the powerful emotions that drive that job search against you. We talked with Mechele Mills, President of the East Texas Better Business Bureau. She offered straight talk on job scams in our area, along with tips for not being a victim.

East Texas Job Scams

When we asked Ms. Mills what types of job scams she had seen in East Texas, she said they typically fell into the following categories:

  • Work from home jobs – With this type of scam, none of the interviewing is done in person. The scammer and job candidate exchange information through email and there’s never a phone call, video interview or any other personal contact. The goal of this type of scam is typically identity theft. Scammers might ask for personal and sometimes bank account information, saying they need it to evaluate candidates for the position.

 

  • Jobs that require a background check – When people are looking for a nanny or other type of caregiver, it’s normal to ask for a background check. What isn’t normal is to ask for money up front. In this type of East Texas job scam, the fake employer asks for a money order or wire transfer without an interview or any other personal contact.

 

  • Re-shipping schemes – Ads for this type of scheme seek people for package processing or forwarding. Scammers ask people to accept shipments at their home address and send them out again to a different location. They often require prospects to provide their bank account, driver’s license, social security number or PayPal account.

 

  • Grassroots Campaign scams – Recently the BBB has seen postings for jobs campaigning for a cause. People are passionate about campaigning for women’s rights or education reform, and they want to make a difference. Often scammers ask for background check money and steal it.

Technology makes it easy for scammers. They advertise in the Thrifty Nickel, newspaper ads and online.

Red Flags to Watch For

If it seems too good to be true, listen to that inner voice of warning. Job scams often ask people to do something that doesn’t require a lot of experience. The position usually seems to pay more than you would expect for that type of job.

Many scams come from overseas, so poor grammar is also a warning sign. Watch for spelling errors, odd word placement or British English spelling (organise instead of organize, colour instead of color).

Find a Job Opportunity that’s Legitimate

When we asked Ms. Mills how she recommended East Texans identify legitimate job opportunities, she said your best bet is to go through a local employment agency. They have relationships with businesses in the community, know which of those businesses are hiring and can take a personal interest in helping job seekers find a position.

They also know each company’s culture and can find a better fit. They receive their fees from the employer, so there’s never a cost to the job seeker.

Brelsford Personnel talks with job candidates one on one to match them with East Texas employers. Search our online postings today.

Sources:
Interview

Content by Missy for Brelsford Personnel