How to Resign Without Burning Bridges

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How to Resign Without Burning Bridges

If you’ve found a new job, congratulations! It’s exciting to think of the opportunities ahead, but first, you have to wrap things up with your current employer. There’s no getting around the fact that resigning is uncomfortable. Even if you’re positive you’ll never be back, you want to leave on good terms. Let’s look at the basics on how to resign from a job.

Frequently Asked Resignation Questions

How soon do I need to turn in my resignation notice?

Two weeks’ notice is standard for most positions.

Can I tell my boss I’m quitting in a text message?

No. You’ll need to write a professional resignation letter and have an in-person conversation. If you can’t meet with them in person, make a phone call.

Who do I need to tell first?

When you resign, talk to your direct manager before you let co-workers know you’re leaving.

Can my company stop me from resigning?

If you’re bound by a contract of employment, there may be stipulations for how and when you can quit. Otherwise, your boss may hate to see you go, but he or she can’t refuse your resignation.

What if I’m quitting because I’m fed up with my job?

Keep things positive during your resignation. You want to leave on good terms, so avoid complaining or bragging about your new job.

Resignation Letter Basics

Don’t just drop off a resignation letter, talk to your employer first in person or over the phone. If they ask for a formal letter, recognize it will go in your employment file, so you want to keep things professional.

A formal resignation letter should be brief, polite and to the point. Start with a friendly opening like, “Dear Ms. Smith,” or “Dear Bob,” depending on how you normally address your manager. Then, clearly state your intent to resign.

Give your employer a reasonable amount of time to hire your replacement. Let them know in your letter when will be your last day of employment. You don’t have to share your reason for leaving, but in some situations it helps. For example, if you’ve decided not to return from maternity leave or your spouse got a job offer out of state. Letting your boss know takes some of the sting out of your resignation. It’s also acceptable to say you’re resigning for personal reasons.

Let your employer know you’re willing to help out if necessary. You might be able to help train a new hire or transition some of your duties to a co-worker within your department.

Finally, express gratitude. Whether you liked your old job or not, focus on the positive. Thank your employer for the experience, the opportunities and the knowledge you gained from working at his or her company. Use a friendly closing like “Sincerely,” or “Respectfully.”

If you’re looking for new opportunities, experience Brelsford Personnel’s fresh approach. Browse the positions we have available online, then get in touch.

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