How to Get Your Employees to Show Up Every Day This Fall

How to Get Your Employees to Show Up Every Day This Fall

Cold and flu season is coming. Employees have probably already started asking off for holiday travel. Sometime in the next few months, you’re probably going to notice you have more staff calling in than usual. You want them to stay home when they’re sick, but you also need them to keep absenteeism to a minimum. There are things you can do to reduce the number of call-ins.

Formalize Your Attendance Policy

Spell out exactly what you expect. Answer the following questions:

  • At what time are employees tardy?
  • What types of absences will you approve? How should employees document them?
  • What is the procedure for requesting an absence?
  • How many absences do you consider excessive?
  • What disciplinary action will you take if they exceed that number?
  • What happens if someone is a “no show”? Are there emergency situations in which you’ll excuse an unscheduled absence or no call?

Put your attendance policy in the handbook, make it a part of new hire orientation and explain it in your next staff meeting.

Promote Wellness

Sometimes well-meaning employees show up when they’re just coming down with a cold or the flu. You disinfect the bathrooms, but what about other surfaces with which employees come into contact? Make antibacterial wipes available and encourage their use on keyboards, desktops and landlines.

Step back and look for places germs can hide. That candy basket on the breakroom table has been sitting there for months. Employees eat lunch then reach for a piece after touching their faces. The microwave handle, refrigerator door, coffee pot handle and vending machine buttons all need regular disinfection.

Reward Attendance

Think through the most common reasons your employees miss work and use that to incentivize attendance instead. If you know last year employees called in to get their Thanksgiving shopping done without the crowds, reward perfect attendance the rest of the month with a few hours of flex time to be used as needed. Enter employees who stayed healthy all winter in a raffle to win a massage or gym membership on January 1.

Keep Good Records

When someone calls in, document who it was and why. That might seem like a no-brainer, but you’d be surprised how many managers rely on their memory. It seems like Suzy’s chair was often empty, but they’re not sure exactly how many days she actually called in sick, how many she was just late and for which ones she claimed a last minute family emergency.

Documentation helps you spot trends. If you see Suzy calls in every Friday and Monday, you know the problem probably isn’t persistent infection. You’ll also notice those employees who never miss a day and deserve recognition.

Often having a formal plan and a reward system clarifies expectations and encourages attendance. Create yours now for employees that show up every day this fall.

Sources:
https://www.naturalhr.com/blog/reducing-workplace-absenteeism-five-simple-tactics
https://www.masterclassmanagement.com/ManagementCourse-DealingWithAttendance.html

Simple Ways You Can Improve Employee Motivation Today

Simple Ways You Can Improve Employee Motivation Today

If you manage East Texas employees, there’s a tough season ahead. This time of year parents struggle to get into a fresh back-to-school routine. Almost everyone starts thinking toward the holidays. Distractions and fatigue make motivation start to wane.

You’ve seen your team at their best, and you want to minimize disengagement. Try these simple strategies to reignite a spark that’s beginning to flicker.

Launch a Monthly Recognition Plan

A paycheck is a good motivation for showing up, but what you want is for employees to give their very best. To do so every day takes a tremendous amount of energy and dedication.

The ones who give the most do it from the heart. They often feel an emotional connection to their work. They get personal satisfaction from a job well done and feel like they are a part of your company’s mission. Acknowledge them to point out those traits to others.

Make it a public recognition to affirm to those employees they’re doing the right thing, that they’re the best of the best. Point out specifics so other staff members know what you’re looking for. Recognize them on social media so their family and friends know they’re great at what they do.

Survey employees to find out what type of recognition means the most to them. Would your employee of the month most value a certificate they can hang on their wall, a designated parking space, extra flexible minutes or other awards?

Write Thank You Notes

Go to a Tyler or Longview office supply store and get a box of blank notes with envelopes. Use them to create hand-written thank you notes. Sure, it’s the digital age and email is easier, but that’s what will make your statement of appreciation into a keepsake for the recipients. They don’t have to be long or complex.

There probably are already a few people you need to thank. Sit down and give yourself a head start as soon as you have your stationery.

Notes can be as simple as “Dear April, I don’t know if you realize how much you bring to our business. The way you smile and greet everyone who walks through the door makes this a warm and inviting place. Thank you so much for always being incredibly positive.”

Chunk Big Projects

No, we don’t mean chunk them out the window. One solution could be the Agile Method. It was developed in the software design industry, but it is effective for almost all teams responsible for completing large or complex projects.

The way it works: Instead of giving groups the whole elephant to eat at once, break assignments down into smaller portions and complete them in timed sections called “sprints.” Plan a small amount of the work to be done and set a time limit during which everyone works as hard as possible. Then take a break, reevaluate and move on to the next phase.

You may find teams accomplish more in a shorter time frame than they would plodding along at a steady pace with no definite deadline. It is also motivating to frequently point out how much ground the teams have covered.

Micro-Manage Less

Give your teams autonomy while they’re working toward each goal. People want to feel they’re in charge of their work, their time and their accomplishments. If you’re constantly telling them how to do what you hired them for, it’s an energy sucker. A true sense of ownership is motivating.

Sometimes hiring managers say they would turn over tasks to their employees, but they don’t have people they can trust to take charge. At Brelsford Personnel we screen candidates to find those who don’t just have the skills, they’re passionate about what they do. Get in touch, we’ll help you find the staff that meets your needs and budget.

Sources:
https://www.naturalhr.com/blog/its-not-all-about-bonuses-how-to-motivate-employees-for-free
https://hiring.workopolis.com/article/5-ways-inspire-motivate-employees/
https://www.snacknation.com/blog/how-to-motivate-employees/

How to Rock Your First Day on the Job

How to Rock Your First Day on the Job

No matter how excited you are about starting your new job, you’re probably also nervous. It’s hard being the new kid, and you want to make a good first impression on the people you’ll be working with for in the foreseeable future. Try these tips to make that first day a success.

The Night Before

Your nerves are already prickly, so use that extra energy to make the next morning go smoothly. You’ll sleep better if you know you’re prepared.

Dress code varies by workplace. Take your clothing cues from the people who sat in on your interview.

Don’t just pick out what you’ll wear, try it on. If you bought something new to make a strong first impression, make sure it looks as professional in your bedroom mirror as you remember it did in the store. Locate the belt, scarf, shoes and jewelry you intended to wear with it.

If you wear brand new shoes you take the chance you’ll be limping by lunchtime. It’s better to select a pair you know will get you through the day with a spring in your step.

Set your alarm for at least half an hour earlier than you will on most days. Aim to arrive much, much earlier than you are required to. At best you’ll be there early, enter relaxed and make a great first impression. If something goes wrong, you’ll still be on time.

When You Arrive

Take a deep breath before you walk in the door and remind yourself no one expects you to learn everyone’s name and master every procedure on the first day. Show your positive attitude and enthusiasm for your new job and the rest will follow.

Nervousness makes people hunch their shoulders, look down and avoid eye contact, none of which looks friendly. Keep your head up and shoulders back as you meet people. Make eye contact and offer a welcoming smile.

Lean in when people are speaking to show you’re actively listening. Offer a handshake when you meet people, then allow your arms to hang at your sides instead of crossing them.

When you meet people, repeat their name back to them to help yourself remember. Say something like, “It’s great to meet you Samantha, how long have you been with XYZ Company?” If their name is unusual, ask how they spell it to help etch it in your memory.

Throughout the Day

Ask questions and seek help when you need it. People understand you’re new and will likely see your questions as eagerness to do a good job. If you attend training, show up with a note taking device and use it. Stay off your cell phone and don’t use your work computer for personal use.

If people invite you to eat lunch with them or attend an after-hours activity, join them! Express appreciation for the invitation, and for other ways people help you your first day.

In the evening, if the company website includes employee photos, review names and faces. Plan as thoroughly for your second day as you did for the first and you’ll find yourself in a positive routine that brings success in all the days to come.

Sources:
https://www.themuse.com/advice/what-you-must-do-the-night-before-starting-a-new-job
https://www.salary.com/articles/first-days-on-the-job-15-ways-to-make-a-great-impression/
https://www.livecareer.com/career/advice/jobs/first-days-working

Become a Human Lie Detector During Recruiting

Become a Human Lie Detector During Recruiting

Sometimes what candidates say sounds a little fishy. Other times they omit key details that would probably influence your hiring decision. A bad hire is costly, so recruiters should know how to spot an untruth.

Find Their Baseline

An actual polygraph (lie detector) test works by measuring a person’s breathing, pulse, blood pressure and perspiration. Some also measure body movement. After the technician attaches sensors to the subject, they ask simple questions to establish what is normal for that person. Try doing a similar evaluation the next time you conduct an interview.

Start with low-stress questions like how long it took them to get to your office or how they heard about the position. Notice how they sit in their chair, how they breathe and what their eyes do when they’re comfortable. Since you’re interviewing them for a job not interrogating them for murder, candidates probably aren’t going to break a sweat when they lie, but they might show subtle changes in body language.

Signs to Watch For

There’s a myth that when people are right handed, they look to the right when they’re telling the truth and look to the left when they tell a lie. Unfortunately it’s not that simple. Each person is different. Watch for deviations from the baseline in these areas.

  • Speech – When people feel nervous their pulse speeds up and sometimes their throat gets tight. Their voice might have a higher pitch when they give an invented response. If they pause frequently or keep clearing their throat, they might be stalling while they try to think of a response.

 

  • Body language – If your candidate was calm for the first part of the interview and they suddenly start shifting in their chair, shuffling their feet or fidgeting with their hands or clothing, pay extra attention to their words. If they were animated for most of the conversation and suddenly become still, that might also signal dishonesty.

 

  • Micro-expressions – Sometimes you see a flicker of emotion that happens so quickly you question if it was ever there in the first place. Learn to trust your gut. If you asked a question and saw a split second of panic, fear, concern or irritation, listen very closely to what comes next.

Keep in mind that it’s natural to be nervous during an interview. When you suspect an untruth, ask more questions until you feel you’ve either given the candidate a chance to talk through their anxiety or give more evidence they’re being dishonest.

Listen to that inner voice that says there might be something going on. Make a note to fact check before you make a final decision.

Grammar Giveaways

Honest responses tend to use first person pronouns and be rich in details. When someone is lying, they have to invent their response on the fly. The answer might be vague and use second or third person pronouns as they unconsciously distance themselves from their lie. They also might add qualifiers to make the story seem more impressive than it is. Compare these two responses:

“I once worked for a group of real estate professionals who wanted to improve their online presence. Their mobile load speed was slow, they had old information on their website, data just wasn’t arranged logically. They wanted to be involved in the improvement process. So I sat down with their team. They have this conference room with huge windows and we used those as a work surface. We put all their site elements on post-it notes and used that to make a sitemap.”

That response has first person pronouns and details like the post-it notes that indicate it’s a genuine memory. A dishonest response might be more like this:

“There were these helpful people at a company who really contributed to what was done. They had a lot of ideas for their website redesign, and everyone was super happy in the end.”

The second response is short on details. It uses second person pronouns and qualifiers like “really contributed,” and “super happy.”

Skip the Struggle

At Brelsford Personnel, we have over 30 years of experience helping companies and job seekers find the perfect match. We conduct thorough background and reference checks and we spend time getting to know candidates one-on-one. Hiring strong employees doesn’t have to be a struggle. Get in touch to find out more.

Sources:
https://www.forbes.com/sites/markmurphy/2017/11/12/how-to-tell-if-a-job-candidate-is-lying-in-the-interview/#5dc06ac111e0
https://hiring.workopolis.com/article/7-telling-interview-questions/
https://www.coburgbanks.co.uk/blog/assessing-applicants/5-ways-to-tell-someone-is-lying/

Why Someone Else Got the East Texas Job You Wanted

Why Someone Else Got the East Texas Job You Wanted

You thought it was a sure thing. You had all the qualifications and felt like your background and experience made you a perfect fit. You felt a connection with the interviewer. They may even have indicated you could expect to hear good things soon.

That’s why you felt stunned and confused when you heard they gave the job, your job, to someone else. Everyone’s situation is different, but if it happened to you, identifying what went wrong might lead to a better result next time.

The Other Candidate Was an Exact Match

The person interviewing you might have genuinely felt you would probably be their next hire. You already had most of the skills they were looking for and your personality seemed like it would fit well with their existing team.

Then the next person they interviewed seemed like they were tailor-made for the position. You were a good fit, but they were perfect.

They Hired the Most Prepared Interviewee

Think back through your interview. Did some of the questions catch you off guard? Employers hire candidates who have done their research and ask questions like the following:

  • What do you most value about our company’s mission?
  • What about the job description caught your eye?
  • What can you bring to our company?

The candidate they hired may have spent time before the interview in intense study. If they researched the company and had a firm grasp of how their background and skills related to the job description and you didn’t, you may have been outshined.

Employers are looking for specifics. Before your next interview, be sure you can articulate what you bring to the table. Pay special attention to the job description. Think of several specific examples where you have displayed the job characteristics they’re looking for.

The Other Candidate Had These Characteristics

CareerBuilder interviewed 2,076 hiring managers and human resource professionals in a number of industries. They asked if they were evaluating two candidates and both had the same skills, educational background and work history, how they would decide who to pick. Here are the top three most influential characteristics:

  • 27 percent of hiring managers said they would pick the candidate with a better sense of humor.
  • 26 percent showed preference for people who are involved in the community.
  • 22 percent of interviewers said they would choose the candidate who was better dressed.

If you’ve been passed over for a position, next time show how you have those characteristics. Interviews are stressful, but don’t be afraid to laugh at yourself and show your good nature.

When questions involve your hobbies and interests, mention how you work with your son’s little league team and volunteer unloading cars at the elementary school. Dress for success with the guidelines on our resources page.

Find a Job in East Texas

At Brelsford Personnel, we help East Texans reach their career goals. Submit your resume to us and become one of our registered candidates today.

Sources:
https://www.careerbuilder.com/share/aboutus/pressreleasesdetail.aspx?sd=8%2F28%2F2013&id=pr778&ed=12%2F31%2F2013
https://www.warnersearchgroup.com/news/20-reasons-someone-else-got-the-job-instead-of-you-26503

Looking for Work? Find Out How Low Unemployment Numbers Affect Your Search

Looking for Work? Find Out How Low Unemployment Numbers Affect Your Search

If you’re thinking about finding a new job, now might be the best time to do it. The national July jobs report showed employers added fewer net jobs last month than economists forecast, but unemployment still dipped near an 18-year low.

That means there aren’t as many people looking for jobs, so employers with openings have a reduced number of candidates to choose from and you have less competition for the position you want. Learn how that might affect your job hunt.

Referrals Matter More Than Ever

When unemployment is low, employers need to make every hire count and retain current staff. Recruiting software manufacturer iCIMS wanted to know factors contributing to a good hire, so they conducted surveys and studied data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Their resulting Modern Job Seeker Report found employees who were hired because of a referral were more likely to stay put.

Employers often ask their current employees if they know someone who would be a good fit. They’re more likely to hire based on a referral than on a resume submission because those hires tend to align with current culture and don’t move around.

In the iCIMS report, 70 percent of the employees surveyed were still in the role for which they were hired. If you know someone already employed where you want to work, ask for their help in getting the job.

Higher Wages, More Perks

In July of 2018, wages were at an all-time high with an average of 22.65/hour. A tight labor market and strong demand for goods and services means employers are willing to pay more for top talent.

Employers aren’t just using increased pay to sell themselves to candidates; they’re emphasizing company culture with perks like flexible scheduling and competitive benefits.

Expect Additional Scrutiny

Employers want to fill vacancies quickly, but when the applicant pool is small and getting smaller, they aren’t just looking for bodies. They may ask you to attend more than one interview to make sure you’re the best fit. The whole team might want to evaluate your skills and qualifications before making a final decision.

Industries Adding Most Jobs

Not all industries are hiring at the same rate. When you’re applying for a high-demand position, you have an advantage, but it might be harder to find work in sectors that show signs of a struggle.

According to last month’s report sporting goods, hobby, book and music retailers are losing jobs. Two sectors showing growth are construction and manufacturing.

Even though the housing market has shown a decline in the last three quarters, employers in the construction sector added 19,000 jobs last month across the nation. Manufacturing added 37,000 jobs. Healthcare employment, professional and business services and food services are also up.

Find a Job in East Texas

What East Texas job are you looking for? Brelsford Personnel has employers seeking administrative assistants, customer service representatives, accountants and more. Search our online job postings today.

Sources:
https://www.businessinsider.com/us-housing-slowdown-economy-2018-7
https://www.icims.com/sites/www.icims.com/files/public/hei_assets/Modern-Job-Seeker-Report%20Final.pdf
https://www.nytimes.com/2018/05/04/business/economy/jobs-report.html
https://www.businessinsider.com/us-jobs-report-july-2018-2018-8
https://money.usnews.com/money/blogs/outside-voices-careers/articles/2018-07-20/how-a-low-unemployment-rate-may-affect-your-job-search

Succeeding At Work Even When You Have a Difficult Boss

Succeeding At Work Even When You Have a Difficult Boss

Last year Gallup’s World Poll released staggering statistics. They surveyed employees from 160 countries and found only 15 percent of them said they felt engaged at work. Of other 85 percent, many were okay with their company or organization; they just said they don’t like their boss. If you’re in that 85 percent, maintain your focus and keep a tough boss from ruining your week with these tips.

Step Back and Evaluate

Sometimes employees get stuck in a loop of working hard hoping to gain approval, praise or promotion and receiving the opposite. They get angry, resentment grows and conflict may occur. After a while, the employee might decide to do better, work harder or put in more hours and the cycle starts over again.

If that’s you, it’s time to break the cycle. Take some time to ask yourself the following questions:

  • What motivates your boss to exhibit the behavior that causes problems? Do they have higher-ups applying the same pressure? Are there factors or requirements making them feel out of control, so they take it out on those nearby? Understanding motivation might help you be patient with them.

 

  • How do you react when you feel opposition? Do you resentfully take longer to do a task or hide until things blow over? Are there other more positive ways you could respond?

 

  • Are there pet peeves you could be extra diligent to avoid? If dress code violations set him or her off, don’t see how close to the line you can skate before you get an email rant. If deadlines make her nervous, don’t wait until the last minute to turn in your part of the project.

Dealing with a difficult boss is like many other relationships. Sometimes finding an acceptable compromise or putting in extra effort isn’t about giving in to unreasonable demands; it’s about preserving your sanity.

Communicate More Effectively

If you feel like you need more feedback or direction, ask your boss if you can schedule a meeting to help improve your job performance. Have a frank discussion about what your boss feels are your most important duties and why.

Listen for the goals behind the words. If you feel your boss is willing, explore ways to prevent future misunderstanding and frustration without placing blame.

Further improve communication by repeating back the message. For example, if your boss says, “Get me that now,” compliance might not be possible in the next 60 seconds, but don’t panic. Repeat back something like, “Sure, I will before lunchtime be okay?”

Enlist Support

Find a trustworthy person who is thriving in the workplace and learn from them. Don’t choose the group that gossips or gripes, look for someone who can listen and support from a position of positivity and understanding.

If your job is making your life miserable and nothing you do seems to help, it may be time to change positions. Watch for openings within your company and see if there’s the possibility of a transfer or start researching employment at another organization.

Brelsford Personnel places qualified candidates with top East Texas employers. Browse our online postings or get in touch today.

 

3 Must-Haves for the Ultimate Cover Letter

3 Must-Haves for the Ultimate Cover Letter

Job seekers put a lot of work into the job hunt and resume preparation. Without a great cover letter, employers might not even look at your resume. At Brelsford Personnel we’ve seen thousands of cover letters, so we have a pretty good handle on what gets results. Read on to discover how to catch that potential employer’s attention, highlight your qualifications and land the interview.

Three Brief Paragraphs

A good cover letter is no longer than three short paragraphs. Hiring managers and staffing agencies are busy. You put your education, work history and volunteer experience in your resume, so you don’t need to list it all again in your cover letter.

Use what you know about the employer and the job description to choose which of your skills to highlight. While you want to let potential employers know your capabilities, at this point you might not have enough information to state you’re the perfect fit. Stick to a short summary of what you know you can do.

These Cover Letter Sections

At the top of your cover letter, put your contact details. Include your name, street address, phone number and email address. If your LinkedIn profile is complete and updated, you can include that as well.

Beneath your contact information, create a section with the date, hiring manager’s name, the company address and phone number and the contact person’s email. If at all possible, address your letter to a person and not the generic “To Whom it May Concern” or “Sir or Madam.”

Grab attention with a first paragraph that tells how you heard about the job, why you’re interested and what professional experience you can contribute. Use the second paragraph to provide specifics on how your skills fit the job description. For example, if the job description states the employer wants an administrative assistant with technology and communication skills, succinctly explain how you used tools like Microsoft Office Suite, WordPress and Outlook to effectively communicate in a previous role.

Use your third paragraph to thank the potential employer for considering you and to request an interview. Wrap it up with “Sincerely” or “Respectfully,” then your name.

Extra Information If You’re Relocating

If your job change coincides with a move to East Texas, mention why in your cover letter. Employers are edgy about hiring someone who might not stick around, so if you have family ties, you’ve already bought a home or you have other strong reasons to want employment in the area, let them know. Tell when you anticipate moving and when you’re available for interviews.

More Job Search Resources

Find advice for writing your resume, dressing for interview success and acing the interview on our resources page. Then check out our online job postings today.

Sources:

https://writing.wisc.edu/Handbook/CoverLetters.html
https://resumecompanion.com/how-to-write-a-cover-letter/
http://money.cnn.com/2017/11/16/pf/how-to-write-cover-letter/index.html

Power Through Your Day With 5 Productivity Tips

Power Through Your Day With 5 Productivity Tips

Do you go to bed at night feeling like you’re wiped out, but you didn’t accomplish everything you needed to? That might be because work days are long and life is stressful, but sometimes a few changes can make all the difference. Try these 5 small changes that make a big difference.

Work in Chunks

It feels like you need to multi-task to get everything done, but that’s like slicing your focus into ineffective slivers. The American Psychological Association found shifting frequently between tasks cuts productivity by as much as 40 percent.

Think about how many times during the day you click over to email or pick up your cell phone because you hear it vibrate. It seems like only a few seconds, but in the course of the day it adds up.

What tasks are you behind on? Where could you stand to be as much as 40 percent more productive? Set aside chunks of time during which you give them your undivided focus.

Don’t just silence your cell and throw it in a drawer, turn it completely off or the vibration will pique your curiosity until you can’t resist checking. Sign out of your email and close the tab so you don’t receive notifications of every incoming message. Whether your chunks are 15 minutes or an hour, you’ll complete more work in that time frame than you would if you were multi-tasking.

Set a Two Minute Timer

Use this strategy to knock out tasks you find yourself dreading or putting off. When you arrive at work, before you leave for lunch or at the end of the day, set a timer. Do it at the same time every day.

Then for two minutes, sprint through your filing, pay those invoices or respond to one or two of the emails you’ve been putting off. When the timer sounds, you’re through with the unpleasant task until the next day.

Use Technology for Good

Turn your morning commute into a productivity booster by using voice-to-text technology to compile your to-do list for the day. Get a jump on meetings by turning them into teleconferences if others are available.

The online tool Rescue Time monitors how you work and lets you know how much time you spend on email, in meetings and browsing online. Rescue Time Lite is available for free and can provide insight into how you currently work.

Beat the Afternoon Slump

In countries like Spain, Greece and Italy, many employees go home for an afternoon rest. If your employer doesn’t offer a siesta after lunch, that can be a tough time of day. Instead of reaching for a coffee or energy drink, get your blood pumping to invigorate your brain with fresh oxygen.

It’s the last thing you’ll want to do when you start to feel sleepy, but leave your desk. Jog up and down the stairs a few times. If you need to communicate regularly with a co-worker, agree to have that meeting on your feet as you walk around the building or circle the parking lot. Health and fitness blog Greatist provides an extensive article on ways to get moving at work if you need more ideas.

Find a Job You Love

The best way to stay productive and focused every day is to work at a job you enjoy. Let’s sit down and talk about your career objectives when you get in touch today.

Sources:
https://www.inc.com/john-rampton/15-ways-to-increase-productivity-at-work.html
https://www.developgoodhabits.com/how-to-be-productive-work/
https://www.lifehack.org/articles/productivity/more-productive-4-ways-that-really-work.html

East Texas Jobs for College Students

East Texas Jobs for College Students

If you’re enrolled at Tyler Junior College (TJC) or the University of Texas at Tyler (UT Tyler), you don’t have much summer left. Before long you’ll be back in the classroom focused on homework and exams. Most college students also have bills to pay and need to work a part or full-time job. We’ve made a list of some of the best East Texas jobs for college students.

Jobs on Campus

Both TJC and UT Tyler offer employment for students, with some positions available in individual areas of study. The biggest difference between student assistant jobs and work-study jobs is where the funding comes from.

On-campus positions provide hands-on experience that’s great for references when you’re applying for your first job after graduation. You receive a regular paycheck even for work-study jobs and can apply those funds to your tuition or other expenses.

At UT Tyler students can work up to 19.5 hours a week and are paid twice a month. Student employees at TJC can work up to 18 hours a week. You might work in the campus library, get hired by your major’s departmental office or even work at the college fitness center.

Off-Campus Jobs for College Students

College kids in Tyler and Longview typically apply for restaurant and retail positions to make the cash they need to get through school. There’s a growing need for East Texas retail workers at places like The Village at Cumberland Park. Restaurant jobs usually let students attend morning classes, study in the afternoon and work in the evening when eateries experience peak traffic and tips are most likely to be high.

Area Starbucks locations are almost always looking for baristas, and they pay between $7.84 and $8.68/hour. The Starbucks College Achievement Program offers qualified employees assistance in paying for college.

Schedules change every semester, so flexibility is helpful when you’re working on your degree. If you have a reliable car and you don’t mind putting on the miles, Uber advertises you can make your own schedule and work as a driver. If you’re willing to work late nights and weekends you can bank some cash, then cut back on hours when you have to study for finals.

During the summer, East Texas students pick up extra money working as counselors in places like Rose City Summer Camp. The program pays $1,350 for the second half of summer, which is just starting. If you’re working toward a career in education, some of the Tyler and Longview elementary student learning centers hire tutors for summer positions.

Find a Job in East Texas That’s Right for You

Brelsford Personnel is looking for qualified Office Assistants, Bank Tellers and more. Browse our online positions or email employ@brelsfordpersonnel.com .

Sources:
https://www.kiplinger.com/slideshow/college/T014-S001-10-great-part-time-jobs-for-college-students/index.html
https://www.uttyler.edu/careersuccess/studentemployment/index.php
https://fairygodboss.com/articles/high-paying-jobs-for-college-students